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I have to parse a 1Gb XML file with a structure such as below and extract the text within the tags "Author" and "Content":

<Database>
    <BlogPost>
        <Date>MM/DD/YY</Date>
        <Author>Last Name, Name</Author>
        <Content>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Maecenas dictum dictum vehicula.</Content>
    </BlogPost>

    <BlogPost>
        <Date>MM/DD/YY</Date>
        <Author>Last Name, Name</Author>
        <Content>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Maecenas dictum dictum vehicula.</Content>
    </BlogPost>

    [...]

    <BlogPost>
        <Date>MM/DD/YY</Date>
        <Author>Last Name, Name</Author>
        <Content>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Maecenas dictum dictum vehicula.</Content>
    </BlogPost>
</Database>

So far I've tried two things: i) reading the whole file and going through it with .find(xmltag) and ii) parsing the xml file with lxml and iterparse(). The first option I've got it to work, but it is very slow. The second option I haven't managed to get it off the ground.

Here's part of what I have:

for event, element in etree.iterparse(path_to_file, tag="BlogPost"):
    if element.tag == "BlogPost":
        print element.text
    else:
        print 'Finished'

The result of that is only blank spaces, with no text in them.

I must be doing something wrong, but I can't grasp it. Also, In case it wasn't obvious enough, I am quite new to python and it is the first time I'm using lxml. Please, help!

share|improve this question
1  
Well, the BlogPost tags don't seem to contain any text in them. –  Lev Levitsky Mar 24 '12 at 22:30
    
True. What would be the way to get everything that's between the opening and closing BlogPost tag? –  mvime Mar 24 '12 at 22:52
    
If you simply need all the info from inside the BlogPost tags, follow andrew's advice. If you want it HTML-formatted, apply lxml.etree.tostring() to them. –  Lev Levitsky Mar 24 '12 at 22:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted
for event, element in etree.iterparse(path_to_file, tag="BlogPost"):
    for child in element:
        print child.tag, child.text
    element.clear()

the final clear will stop you from using too much memory.

[update:] to get "everything between ... as a string" i guess you want one of:

for event, element in etree.iterparse(path_to_file, tag="BlogPost"):
    print etree.tostring(element)
    element.close()

or

for event, element in etree.iterparse(path_to_file, tag="BlogPost"):
    print ''.join([etree.tostring(child) for child in element])
    element.close()

or perhaps even:

for event, element in etree.iterparse(path_to_file, tag="BlogPost"):
    print ''.join([child.text for child in element])
    element.close()
share|improve this answer
    
This works pretty much like I wanted I'll have to customize it a bit, but it's great. Thanks! –  mvime Mar 24 '12 at 23:02
    
Is there a way to get everything between starting and ending "BlogPost" tags as a string? –  mvime Mar 25 '12 at 0:58
1  
@mvime, as what kind of string? In HTML format? Then see my comment above, lxml.etree.tostring() method does that. You can cut the opening and closing tag off using slice notation (see this table) –  Lev Levitsky Mar 25 '12 at 10:13
    
should the element.close() be element.clear() in the later fragments? so long since i wrote this i no longer remember, but it looks wrong to me. –  andrew cooke Dec 10 '12 at 12:01

I prefer XPath for such things:

In [1]: from lxml.etree import parse

In [2]: tree = parse('/tmp/database.xml')

In [3]: for post in tree.xpath('/Database/BlogPost'):
   ...:     print 'Author:', post.xpath('Author')[0].text
   ...:     print 'Content:', post.xpath('Content')[0].text
   ...: 
Author: Last Name, Name
Content: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Maecenas dictum dictum vehicula.
Author: Last Name, Name
Content: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Maecenas dictum dictum vehicula.
Author: Last Name, Name
Content: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Maecenas dictum dictum vehicula.

I'm not sure if it's different in terms of processing big files, though. Comments about this would be appreciated.

Doing it your way,

for event, element in etree.iterparse(path_to_file, tag="BlogPost"):
     for info in element.iter():
         if info.tag in ('Author', 'Content'):
             print info.tag, ':', info.text
share|improve this answer
    
mm I've simplified the tree a little bit and when I try it it doesn't seem to work. The tag BlogPost for example is not simply '<BlogPost>' but '<BlogPost Owner="Author" Status="Draft">' and the values for Owner and Status change from one entry to the other. –  mvime Mar 24 '12 at 22:50
1  
Additional attributes won't affect this; only the tree structure matters. To catch all the BlogPost elements, you can also use for post in tree.xpath('//BlogPost'): ... –  Lev Levitsky Mar 24 '12 at 22:58
1  
Thanks! I can't vote up yet, but you helped me understand how it works. The answer that I understand better and I have gotten to work is Andrew's though. –  mvime Mar 24 '12 at 23:01
    
have a commiseration upvote ;o) –  andrew cooke Mar 24 '12 at 23:03
2  
I made a comparison recently, and iterparse with clear() consumes much less memory than just XPath. –  Lev Levitsky Apr 9 '12 at 19:28

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