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As the title says, I'm running multiple game servers, and every of them has the same name but different PID and the port number. I would like to match the PID of the server which is listening on certain port, and then I would like to kill this process. I need that in order to complete my bash script.

Is that even possible? Because it didn't find yet any solutions on the web.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 34 down vote accepted

The -p flag of netstat gives you PID of the process:

netstat -l -p

Edit: The command that is needed to get PIDs of socket users in FreeBSD is sockstat. As we worked out during the discussion with @Cyclone, the line that does the job is:

sockstat -4 -l | grep :80 | awk '{print $3}' | head -1
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1  
netstat: 80: unknown or uninstrumented protocol used the 80 (nginx) port for testing purpoes. Not worked. –  Cyclone Mar 24 '12 at 23:36
    
How did you get this error? What exact command produced it? –  stanwise Mar 24 '12 at 23:45
3  
try netstat -nlp | grep :80 instead –  stanwise Mar 24 '12 at 23:51
1  
netstat: option requires an argument -- p –  Cyclone Mar 24 '12 at 23:54
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@jasonbrittain On Cygwin, windows native netstat is called. It has other syntax. –  stanwise Sep 15 '12 at 20:33

Short version which you can pass to kill command:

lsof -i:80 -t
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netstat -nlp should tell you the PID of what's listening on which port.

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netstat: 80: unknown or uninstrumented protocol used the 80 (nginx) port for testing purpoes. Not worked. –  Cyclone Mar 24 '12 at 23:39
    
this answer is good enough for me. –  Siwei Shen Oct 28 '13 at 9:14

netstat -p -l | grep $PORT and lsof -i :$PORT solution good but I prefer to fuser $PORT/tcp extension syntax to POSIX (which work for coreutils) as with pipe:

pid=`fuser $PORT/tcp`

it print pure pid so you can drop sed magic out.

One thing that make fuser my lover tools is ability to send signal to that process directly (this syntax in also extension to POSIX):

$ fuser -k $port/tcp       # with SIGKILL
$ fuser -k -15 $port/tcp   # with SIGTERM
$ fuser -k -TERM $port/tcp # with SIGTERM

Also -k supported by FreeBSD: http://www.freebsd.org/cgi/man.cgi?query=fuser

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