Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Manual Unref

I have an issue with Boost's intrusive pointer. It's boolean conversion operator checks x.get() != 0. However, the code below fails at the marked point. Why is this the case?

I am guessing that I may have to do with the fact that delete does not set a pointer to 0 (or nullptr). If that's not the case, how could I use the intrusive pointer effectively? I would like to be able to use an intrusive pointer like a regular pointer, e.g., in an expression x && x->foo(), but this artefact seems to preclude it.

#include <atomic>
#include <boost/intrusive_ptr.hpp>

struct T
{
    T() : count(0u) { }

    size_t ref_count()
    {
        return count;
    }

    std::atomic_size_t count;
};

void intrusive_ptr_add_ref(T* p)
{
    ++p->count;
}

void intrusive_ptr_release(T* p)
{
    if (--p->count == 0u)
        delete p;
}

int main()
{
    boost::intrusive_ptr<T> x;
    x = new T;
    assert(x->ref_count() == 1);

    auto raw = x.get();
    intrusive_ptr_add_ref(raw);
    intrusive_ptr_add_ref(raw);
    assert(x->ref_count() == 3);

    intrusive_ptr_release(raw);
    intrusive_ptr_release(raw);
    assert(x->ref_count() == 1);

    intrusive_ptr_release(raw); // Destroys T, ref_count() == 0.
    assert(! x); // Fails.

    return 0;
}

(Architecture: Darwin 10.7, tested compilers g++ 4.7 and 4.6 with -std=c++11)

Reference-to-Pointer

After weeding through the source code of intrusive_ptr<T>, I found that there is only one call to intrusive_ptr_release in the destructor:

~intrusive_ptr()
{
    if( px != 0 ) intrusive_ptr_release( px );
}

Since the argument px of type T* is an lvalue, it should be possible to set it to zero by slightly changing the function signature of intrusive_ptr_release:

inline void intrusive_ptr_release(T*& p)
{
    if (--p->count == 0u)
    {
        delete p;
        p = 0;
    }
}

Intuitively, this pointer reference-to-pointer parameter should assign the lvalue of p in the calling context to 0. Bjarne also mentions this idiom. However, the assertion still fails at the marked line, leaving me clueless this time.

Example Usage

The reason why I am ref'ing and unref'ing the pointer manually is that I have to work with the raw pointer for a while when passing it to a C API. This means I have to ref it before passing it to the C API in order to prevent destruction, and recreate an intrusive pointer from the raw pointer when I get it back. Here is an example:

void f()
{
    intrusive_ptr<T> x = new T;
    auto raw = x.get();
    intrusive_ptr_add_ref(raw);
    api_in(raw);
}

void g()
{
    T* raw = api_out();
    intrusive_ptr<T> y(raw, false);
    h(y);
}

Here, the second parameter in the construction of y in g() avoids a ref when getting the pointer back from the C API, which compensates for the manual ref in f().

I realized that manually unreffing an intrusive pointer can lead to unexpected behavior, whereas this usage appears to be fine.

share|improve this question
up vote 11 down vote accepted

The question is: Why do you expect x to convert to false at the end? You're messing with the ref counter in unexpected ways! You're decreasing it to zero even though there is still an intrusive_ptr — x — that points to the object. That's not how it works. The ref counter is supposed to be at least as great as the number of intrusive_ptr objects that point to the ref counted object — otherwise it would not be a ref counter, would it?

share|improve this answer
2  
Put in other words: Intrusive pointers in general, and intrusive_ptr in particular (and also Microsoft COM pointers), work correctly when all of its users obey ownership semantics with its pointers, whether these pointers are C++ templates or raw C pointer. Ownership semantics requires that any refcount-changing event only occur via a pointer (raw or smart) under the condition that ownership by that pointer is ascertained. (In layman terms, you don't meddle what you don't own.) In OP's code sample, the (intrusive_ptr) x is the one which has certain ownership of the object. – rwong Apr 19 '14 at 7:14

Reading the documentation on intrusive_ptr I see there is no connection between "destroying" the object, using its own terminology, and the pointer being 0. So, if you want to use the x && x->foo() idiom, your intrusive_ptr_release function should set the pointer to 0 too.

I can see the design decision here in intrusive_ptr. When intrusive_ptr_release gets called, only destruction should be performed, without including any other behavior than that provided by delete, so if you also want to put the pointer to 0 to support the idiom, you have to do it in your code for that function, but intrusive_ptr itself does not force you to include more restrictions than delete itself: that is, it doesn't force you to reset the pointer to 0.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand the functions intrusive_ptr_add_ref and intrusive_ptr_release to take a raw pointer rather than an intrusive_ptr. This would not allow for setting the private intrusive_ptr member px to 0, or do you mean something else? – mavam Mar 25 '12 at 2:33
    
Ah, I see what you mean. The pointer you get in the function is copied by value, so you cannot modify it. I guess then that this technique can be used as a one-time wrapper of directly received values, to perform (locally, inside a function) a reference counted work with the pointer. – Diego Sevilla Mar 25 '12 at 19:35
    
Would you mind explaining your last comment? I'm not sure if I understand correctly. Perhaps I addressed what you mean with my question edit. – mavam Mar 25 '12 at 20:15
    
Yes, I was about to suggest the change to a T*&, but I'm not sure if this is allowed by the contract of intrusive_ptr. Doing that function in your edit you get the behavior you expect, so I guess it is "practically right". – Diego Sevilla Mar 25 '12 at 20:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.