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I am confused about using php or python for implementing server program. I seems that there are not only syntax differences.

For example, the php program is short-lived (only exist when request comes and die when response is generated) and it can only store things in DB rather than memory.

But for python (using TwistedWeb), the python program is long-lived. It can hold things in memory, doing something else when there are no request.

Am I wrong? I am confused and please help me to clarify it.

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closed as not constructive by deceze, PeeHaa, Tadeck, SingleNegationElimination, agf Mar 25 '12 at 1:28

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
"I am confused" Okay. What are you confused about? – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 25 '12 at 1:01
    
Well yes, they're very different languages. You can implement pretty much anything in either regardless, using different approaches. Learn both languages until you can can judge for yourself which is better suited for your particular case. – deceze Mar 25 '12 at 1:02
1  
Are you sure you don't want to make other words bold too, just in case? – PeeHaa Mar 25 '12 at 1:02
    
I don't know am I wrong about the above statement... – Bear Mar 25 '12 at 1:03
1  
Please just tell me how to improve the question rather than cast the close vote. – Bear Mar 25 '12 at 1:07
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Lets answer your questions one by one:

I am confused about using php or python for implementing tracker server. I seems that there are not only syntax differences.

Correct, they are two very different languages. PHP in versions > 5.3 is quite mature, but it is rather subjective. Python is very well designed language.

For example, the php program is short-lived (only exist when request comes and die when response is generated) and it can only store things in DB rather than memory.

Incorrect. PHP was designed as such, as far as I know, but that does not mean you cannot use it for longer processing, or for storing some things in memory (PHP can eg. use memcached).

But for python (using TwistedWeb), the python program is long-lived. It can hold things in memory, doing something else when there are no request.

Twisted is for writing server-like scripts, but Python can also work in a per-request basis.

Am I wrong? I am confused and please help me to clarify it.

Yes, you are wrong about the above:

  • PHP can be used to create scripts executing longer than the requests last,
  • using PHP you can still store data in the memory in many different ways,
  • Python can also end execution after the request ends,

You are right about some things, though:

  • PHP was originally designed to work for generating pages on a per-request basis,
  • Twisted is a very good solution for writing servers,
  • Python and PHP are different,
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Thx a lot I think I should choose python this time:) – Bear Mar 25 '12 at 1:19
1  
@Bear: Choose what is easier for you and what you know better. Twisted for writing a server is a very good choice, though. If you have chosen Python, learn it and follow its coding style, avoid hacks - the code will be easier to maintain and will be more "pythonic". Which of these two languages do you know better? – Tadeck Mar 25 '12 at 1:32

That's not entirely correct, you can keep things "in memory" by using PHP sessions.

//Start a session
session_start();

//Save a value that'll be available until the session is destroyed
$_SESSION["foo"] = "bar";

As for "doing something else when there are no request" you can always set up a Cron Job (Linux) or Task Scheduler (Windows) when you need to periodically run a PHP script.

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But as far as I know , session is independent for different users. I can not have a variable share between users (eg online list) – Bear Mar 25 '12 at 1:18
    
That's right, sessions do not enable memory sharing among users. For that you have several solutions, such as Memcached, Shared Memory or APC. – Telmo Marques Mar 25 '12 at 1:32

Both PHP and Python can be used for long running programs.

PHP was designed as a embeddable programing language for web servers. In the environment it is commonly set up in the web server (generally Apache with mod_php) has PHP running in it and the entire PHP environment is set up and torn down for each request.

Python was designed as a general purpose language. When used for developing web applications it is generally run separately from the web server process and it has requests routed to it by the web server (Apache, ngix, etc.)

There is no reason that this has to be this way - you can set up a Python program to run over CGI (where it will be re-started for each request) and you can set up PHP to run as a FastCGI program and it will be run separately from the web server and stay up between requests.

However, if you want to persist important information (for example statistics about the total number of requests received or the total amount of work performed) between requests you will be far better off persisting them to the filesystem (via files, a database, etc) or to another in-memory process like Redis or Memcached. Even when the application process is run separate of the web server it often spawns several child processes and these processes are started and stopped after serving a certain number of requests (or after a certain amount of uptime) in order to release system resources. Important information needs to be persisted elsewhere (and backed-up regularly).

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