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I'm trying to understand Inversion of Control and how it helps me with my unit testing. I've read several online explanations of IOC and what it does, but I'm just not quite understanding it.

I developed a sample project, which included using StructureMap for unit testing. StructureMap setup code like the following:

private readonly IAccountRepository _accountRepository

public Logon()
{
    _accountRepository = ObjectFactory.GetInstance<IAccountRepository>();
}

The thing I'm not understanding though, is as I see it, I could simply declare the above as the following:

AccountRepository _accountRepository = new AccountRepository();

And it would do the same thing as the prior code. So, I was just wondering if someone can help explain to me in a simple way, what the benefit of using IOC is (especially when dealing with unit testing).

Thanks

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1  
That's not IoC. –  Krzysztof Kozmic Mar 25 '12 at 6:47

3 Answers 3

There are basically two forms/implementations of Inversion of Control: Service Locator and Dependency Injection.

With the Service Locator pattern, you call a static factory from within the class that needs the dependency. In general, it looks like this:

public class Service
{
    private readonly IDependency dependency;

    public Service()
    {
        this.dependency = ServiceLocator.GetInstance<IDependency>();
    }

    public void SomeOperation()
    {
        this.dependency.Execute();
    }
}

This example should look familiar to you, since this what you're doing in your Logon method: You are using the Service Locator pattern.

With the Dependency Injection pattern, you inject all dependencies a class needs from the outside; preferably using the constructor. The class itself isn't responsible for getting its dependencies. That responsibility is moved up up the call stack. The previous class would look like this when using Dependency Injection:

public class Service
{
    private readonly IDependency dependency;

    public Service(IDependency dependency)
    {
        this.dependency = dependency;
    }

    public void SomeOperation()
    {
        this.dependency.Execute();
    }
}

Both patterns are Inversion of Control, since in both cases the Service class isn't responsible of creating the dependencies and doesn't know which implementation it is using. It just talks to the interface. Both patterns give you flexibility over the implementations a class is using and thus allow you to write more flexible software.

There are however, many problems with the Service Locator pattern, and that's why it is considered an anti-pattern. You are already experiencing these problems, since you are wondering how IoC (Service Locator in your case) helps you with unit testing.

The answer is that the Service Locator pattern does not help with unit testing. On the contrary: it making unit testing very hard. By letting the class call the ObjectFactory, you create a hard dependency between the two. Replacing IAccountRepository for testing, also means that your unit test must make use of the ObjectFactory. This makes your unit tests harder to read. But more importantly, since the ObjectFactory is a static instance, all unit tests make use of that same instance, which makes it hard to run tests in isolation and swap implementations on a per-test basis.

I used the Service Locator pattern in the past, and the way I dealt with this, was by registering dependencies in my Service Locator that that I could change on a thread-by-thread basis (using [ThreadStatic] field under the covers). This allowed me to run my tests in parallel (what MSTest does by default) while keeping tests isolated. The problem with this however, is that this gets complicated really fast, clutters the tests with all kind of technical stuff, and it made me spent a lot of time solving these technical problems, while I could have been writing more tests.

The real solution to these problems is Dependency Injection. Once you inject the dependencies a class needs through its constructor, all those problems go away. Not only does this make it very clear what dependencies a class needs (no hidden dependencies), but every unit test is itself responsible for injecting the dependencies it needs. This makes writing tests much easier and prevents you from ever having to configure a DI container in your unit tests. This doesn't mean however, that every class should new up a new instance of the class under

Further reading: Service Locator is an Anti-Pattern.

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I agree with your point that passing in dependencies through the constructor is easier since you don't need a framework to resolve your dependencies. I do however disagree with your "static instance" argument.There is no need to implement this as a Singelton. It's basically just a static method that returns an instance of some data access object. This does not lead to problems when trying to run tests in parallel as there is no shared state through the factory. –  TGH Mar 25 '12 at 20:35
1  
The definition of Inversion of Control is that the container chooses the components, not the components choosing the components. The point of IoC is to create components which are loosely coupled and more easily testable. With the Service Locator pattern, the component class is choosing/using the Container, but the container is choosing the IDependency to return. So Service Locator pattern is only halfway there. You trade one hard dependency for another. –  Raul Nohea Goodness Mar 27 '12 at 14:27

The idea behind this is to enable you to swap out the default account repository implementation for a more unit testable version. In your unit tests you can now instantiate a version that doesn't make a database call, but instead returns back fixed data. This way you can focus on testing the logic in your methods and free yourself of the dependency to the database.

This is better on many levels: 1) Your tests are more stable since you no longer have to worry about tests failing due to data changes in the database 2) Your tests will run faster since you don't call out to an external data source 3) You can more easily simulate all your test conditions since your mocked repository can return any type of data needed to test any condition

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The key to answer your question is testability and if you want to manage the lifetime of the injected objects or if you are going to let the IoC container do it for you.

Let's say for example that you are writing a class that uses your repository and you want to test it.

If you do something like the following:

public class MyClass
{
   public MyEntity GetEntityBy(long id)
   {
      AccountRepository _accountRepository = new AccountRepository();

      return _accountRepository.GetEntityFromDatabaseBy(id);
   }
}

When you try to test this method you will find that there are a lot of complications: 1. There must be a database already set up. 2. Your database needs to have the table that has the entity you're looking for. 3. The id that you are using for your test must exist, if you delete it for whatever reason then your automated test is now broken.

If instead you have something like the following:

public interface IAccountRepository
{
   AccountEntity GetAccountFromDatabase(long id);
}

public class AccountRepository : IAccountRepository
{
   public AccountEntity GetAccountFromDatabase(long id)
   {
      //... some DB implementation here
   }
}

public class MyClass
{
   private readonly IAccountRepository _accountRepository;

   public MyClass(IAccountRepository accountRepository)
   {
      _accountRepository = accountRepository;
   }

   public AccountEntity GetAccountEntityBy(long id)
   {
      return _accountRepository.GetAccountFromDatabase(id)
   }
}

Now that you have that you can test the MyClass class in isolation without the need for a database to be in place.

How is this beneficial? For example you could do something like this (assuming you are using Visual Studio, but the same principles apply to NUnit for example):

[TestClass]
public class MyClassTests
{
   [TestMethod]
   public void ShouldCallAccountRepositoryToGetAccount()
   {
      FakeRepository fakeRepository = new FakeRepository();

      MyClass myClass = new MyClass(fakeRepository);

      long anyId = 1234;

      Account account = myClass.GetAccountEntityBy(anyId);

      Assert.IsTrue(fakeRepository.GetAccountFromDatabaseWasCalled);
      Assert.IsNotNull(account);
   }
}

public class FakeRepository : IAccountRepository
{
   public bool GetAccountFromDatabaseWasCalled { get; private set; }

   public Account GetAccountFromDatabase(long id)
   {
      GetAccountFromDatabaseWasCalled = true;

      return new Account();
   }
}

So, as you can see you are able, very confidently, to test that the MyClass class uses an IAccountRepository instance to get an Account entity from a database without the need to have a database in place.

There are a million things you can still do here to improve the example. You could use a Mocking framework like Rhino Mocks or Moq to create your fake objects instead of coding them yourself like I did in the example.

By doing this the MyClass class is completely independent of the AccountRepository so that's when the loosley coupled concept comes into play and your application is testable and more maintainable.

With this example you can see the benefits of IoC in itself. Now if you DO NOT use an IoC container you do have to instantiate all the dependencies and inject them appropriately in a Composition Root or configure an IoC container so it can do it for you.

Regards.

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