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I'm trying to teach myself Objective-C and as an exercise, I'm trying to write an app with one button and one label. When I click on the button, I want to trigger a calculation then see the results in the label. The following code compiles and runs with no errors or warnings but as far as I can tell, the [object method] 'call' doesn't do anything. I've spent hours on this and just don't see what's wrong. Can anyone explain the problem? Thanks.

*** testMethodViewController.h ****

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
#import "testBrain.h"

@interface testMethodViewController : UIViewController 
{
    IBOutlet UILabel *display;
    testBrain *model;
}

- (IBAction)cellPressed:(UIButton *)sender;

@end

*** testMethodViewController.m ****

#import "testMethodViewController.h"

@implementation testMethodViewController

- (testBrain *)model 
{
    if (!model) {model = [[testBrain alloc] init];}
    return model;
}

- (IBAction)cellPressed:(UIButton *)sender
{
    int x = [model check:3];     //This method call doesn't work. But gets no errors.
    NSLog(@"Results from model: %i", x);  //Says x = 0, but I expect 6
    NSString *xAsString = [NSString stringWithFormat: @"testBrain: %i", x];
    display.text = xAsString;   //Label is updated and displays: testBrain: 0
}                               //I expect: testBrain: 6
@end

*** testBrain.h ****

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface testBrain : NSObject {}

- (int) check:(int) anInteger;

@end

*** testBrain.m ****

#import "testBrain.h"

@implementation testBrain

- (int) check:(int) anInteger            //3 passed as the parameter.
{
    int r = anInteger + anInteger;
    NSLog(@"inside check %i", r);    //Debugging line: doesn't print.
    return r; 
}
@end
share|improve this question

When this code runs:

int x = [model check:3];

model is nil. In Objective-C, messages sent to nil silently do nothing, and return 0. So, as you see, x is 0 and -check: is never called.

Apparently you were expecting this method to be called automatically:

- (testBrain *)model 
{
    if (!model) {model = [[testBrain alloc] init];}
    return model;
}

However, that method will be called only if you do it yourself, by saying [self model] or self.model. So, this line would fix it:

int x = [[self model] check:3];

Try it and see.

Going a little further: It would be clearer to remove the model method entirely, and create the instance variable model when the UIViewController is created. That way, we can guarantee that model is valid anytime any code in the testMethodViewController class runs.

You would do that by overriding UIViewController's designated initializer:

- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil
{
    self = [super initWithNibName:nibNameOrNil bundle:nibBundleOrNil];
    if (self) {
        // Now you can initialize your instance variables
        model = [[testBrain alloc] init];
    }

    return self;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the in depth explanation, Kurt. Now I understand why my code was doing what it was doing. You're right. I was expecting - (testBrain *)model to be called automatically. I thought I tried self.model but I guess not. As for second recommendation, is nibNameOrNil a special term or would I simply use any appropriate nib filename? Looks like I have some more reading to do but things are much clearer. Thanks again. – user1290817 Mar 25 '12 at 7:45
    
You don't have to worry about filling in a value for nibNameOrNil -- you just pass that argument straight through to super without changing it. Nothing special about that name, really. If you read the docs for -[UIViewController initWithNibName:bundle:] it explains the name, but it isn't really relevant to anything else here. – Kurt Revis Mar 25 '12 at 8:44

With your model method, you are halfway towards Lazy Instantiation, however to properly achieve this, you must always acess the lazily instantiated object through its accessor method. You aren't doing this in your button action, so your messages are going to nil, which is silently ignored.

This is one of the reasons you often see instance variables in objective-c declared with a leading or trailing underscore. If you then typed model anywhere in the rest of your class, it would be a compiler error, forcing you to use the accessor. Typically this is implemented with properties and the synthesize statement:

In your interface:

@property (nonatomic, strong) TestBrain* model;

In your implementation:

@synthesize model = model_;

Your model method would be:

-(TestBrain*)model
{
    if (!model_)
        model_ = [[TestBrain alloc] init];   
    return model_;
}

You would then use self.model instead of model throughout the rest of the class.

If you are just starting out, the Stanford iOS course on iTunes U is an excellent resource, a lot of this sort of material is covered.

share|improve this answer
int x = [model check:3];

This line should be:

int x = [self.model check:3];
share|improve this answer

you are almost there. You need to use @property and @synthesize in order to complete this. The @synthesize directive will direct the compiler to create the setters and getters for a particular property. The @synthesize directive tells the compiler that variable is a property. Properties allow you to use the dot syntax. i.e. self.model which will automatically the call the getter or setter method, depending on the context.

In your testMethodViewController.h file change it to look like this:

@interface testMethodViewController : UIViewController 
{
    IBOutlet UILabel *display;
    testBrain *model;
}
@property (nonatomic,retain) testBrain *model;

- (IBAction)cellPressed:(UIButton *)sender;

@end

then in the .m implementation you need to use @synthesize after the @implementation. Like this:

@implementation testMethodViewController
@synthesize model;  // tells the compiler to synthesize the setter and getter for you
- (testBrain *)model 
{
    if (!model) {model = [[testBrain alloc] init];}
    return model;
}

then in your cellPressed: method, you need to use self.model in order for the getter to be called:

- (IBAction)cellPressed:(UIButton *)sender
{
    int x = [self.model check:3];     //This method call doesn't work. But gets no errors.
    NSLog(@"Results from model: %i", x);  //Says x = 0, but I expect 6
    NSString *xAsString = [NSString stringWithFormat: @"testBrain: %i", x];
    display.text = xAsString;   //Label is updated and displays: testBrain: 0
}     

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
"Properties allow you to use the dot syntax" -- that's not actually true. The dot syntax foo.value is just another way of doing a regular Obj-C method call [foo value] (and similarly, foo.value = x expands to [foo setValue:x]). You can use dot syntax on methods that aren't declared via @property. – Kurt Revis Mar 25 '12 at 5:11
    
That was fast! For some reason, I'm having trouble seeing my model as a property of anything. I've used @property/@synthesize for other things but I don't think I would have thought to apply it to my model. I guess I have to expand my concept of properties. Thanks. – user1290817 Mar 25 '12 at 7:18

I dont see anywhere in the testMethodViewController.h file

IBOutlet UIButton *button;

Also check if u have properly connected all IBOutlet, IBAction & delegate, datasource.

share|improve this answer
    
This is wrong. A button can work just fine even if there is no outlet to it. And he has verified that his button is hooked up properly, because he sees the NSLog printed by -cellPressed:. – Kurt Revis Mar 25 '12 at 5:07

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