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I am writing a program with SDL. I setup the screen as 600x600. I then draw a circle on the windows. I randomly shoot the whole screen with points and finally count how many points are in the circle, which can used to estimated the area of the circle. But I found that if I initialize the window to bigger (like 1024*768) then the same method will lower the accuracy of the area calculation (to small extent but still not that small). I want to know increase the resolution of the windows doesn't help to improve the resolution of this issue? So how can I take advantage of the bigger resolution ?

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Maybe because 1024x768 isn't square so there are more points outside of the circle? –  Kos Mar 25 '12 at 8:54
    
Just out of interest, could you not work out the area of the circle by instead finding its radius and evaluating pi*r^2? Or am I missing something? –  Alex Z Mar 25 '12 at 8:56
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Also how do you generate your random numbers? rand() isn't random enough if you want to do numerics. Include <random> and use std::mt19937, check if that helps –  Kos Mar 25 '12 at 8:57
    
Hi there, thanks for the reply. I also try 1000*1000, but still not very good. I use mt19937 as well as boost::random, doesn't change a lot. –  user1285419 Mar 25 '12 at 17:49
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I then draw a circle on the windows. I randomly shoot the whole screen with points and finally count how many points are in the circle, which can used to estimated the area of the circle.

Area of circle is equal to pi*(r^2). Where "r" is circle radius.

But I found that if I initialize the window to bigger

Your method will not produce reliable results unless random number generator is perfect It means that it must produce absolutely perfect uniform distribution of points, which is not going to happen. Also you'll need to know area of one "hit", which will be a big problem.

If you insist on reinventing the wheel (and avoid using pi*(r^2) for unknown reason), then instead of "shooting random points". simply scan image line by line, and calculate number of points that are inside the circle. It'll also probably much faster than trying to abuse pseudo-random number generator. And you can accelerate the process (by losing the precision) and instead of checking every pixel, check every 2nd pixel(and row), every 3rd, every 4th, and so on (perfect uniform distribution). It'll be much more reliable and predictable than your PRNG abuse.

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