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I have a list of tuples which represent the coordinates of a shape - "points"

I also have a list of index values which identify the starting point for each part of that shape (since a shape can contain one or more 'islands') - "parts"

Currently, to extract a part's points from the points list I do the following:

points = [
    (0, 0), (1, 0), (2, 1), (3, 2), (0, 0),
    (4, 5), (5, 4), (3, 6), (2, 9), (4, 5),
    (2, 2), (3, 2), (6, 4), (4, 4), (8, 6), (4, 3), (2, 2)
]

parts = [0, 5, 10]

for index, part in enumerate(parts):
    start = part

    try:
        end = parts[index + 1]
    except Exception:
        end = len(points)

    print(points[start:end])

However, this does not feel particularly Pythonic to me. To be honest, the use of the exception just feels downright dirty. Can anyone suggest an improved Python v3 methodology for this particular problem?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You want to do this:

parts = [0, 5, 10, len(points)]
start_end_pairs = zip(parts[:-1], parts[1:])

for start, end in start_end_pairs:
    print(points[start:end])

Explanation

Your parts already contains the starting indices, so you only need to take the contents of that array to calculate what you want.

From [0, 5, 10], you need to take (0, 5) for the first part, (5, 10) for the second, and (10, len(points)) for the third part. The process of creating these pairs to use in the print-loop can easily be implemented with zip. I zip the two arrays:

[0, 5, 10]
[5, 10, len(points)]

to produce

[(0, 5), (5, 10), (10, len(points))]

which is exactly what you need.

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Nice answer :-) –  Raymond Hettinger Mar 25 '12 at 10:20
    
There are some bloody clever people on StackOverflow. Thanks Irfy. –  chrsmrrtt Mar 25 '12 at 10:40
    
Glad to help. If you like the way I used zip above, try taking on some functional programming lectures/tutorials; it made me a better programmer back in the days (and that's where I first saw zip). –  Irfy Mar 25 '12 at 14:45
for i in range(len(parts)):
    if i==len(parts)-1:
        print(points[parts[i]:])
    else:
        print(points[parts[i]:parts[i+1]])

or:

for i in range(len(parts)-1):
    print(points[parts[i]:parts[i+1]])
print(points[parts[-1]:])

or:

for start, end in zip(parts[:-1], parts[1:]):
    print(points[start:end])
print(points[parts[-1]:])
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