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I'm making a dice simulator for school, and I need to calculate the percentage a certain number has been rolled, and I gave it a test run, but somehow I got this:

How many dice do you want to roll?
3
How many times do you want to roll the dice?
1000000
144414: 1000000 196039 %

This is the code for my main class:

#include <iostream>
#include "Dice.h"
#include "DiceSimulator.h"

using namespace std;

static int inputNumber(const string question);

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    int numberOfDice = inputNumber("How many dice do you want to roll?");

    const int times = inputNumber("How many times do you want to roll the dice?");

    DiceSimulator sim(times, numberOfDice);

    cout << sim.howManyTimesDidWeRollACertainNumber(11) 
    << ": " << times << " " 
    << ((sim.howManyTimesDidWeRollACertainNumber(11) * 100.0) / times) 
    << " %" << endl;

    return 0;
}

int inputNumber(const string question)
{
    int number = 0;
    cout << question << endl;
    cin >> number;
    return number;
}

This is my DiceSimulator.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include "DiceSimulator.h"

using namespace std;

DiceSimulator::DiceSimulator(const int times, const int numberOfDice)
{
    this->numberOfDice = numberOfDice;
    int timesRolled[6 * numberOfDice - 2];
    Dice dice[numberOfDice];

    for(int i = numberOfDice; i <= 6 * numberOfDice; i++)
    {
        timesRolled[i - numberOfDice] = 0;
    }

    for(int i = 0; i < times; i++)
    {
        int roll = 0;
        for(int j = 0; j < numberOfDice; j++)
        {
            roll = roll + dice[j].roll();
        }

        timesRolled[roll - numberOfDice]++;
    }

    this->timesRolled = timesRolled;
}

int DiceSimulator::howManyTimesDidWeRollACertainNumber(int number)
{
    if(number < numberOfDice || number > numberOfDice * 6)
        return 0;

    return timesRolled[number - numberOfDice];
}

And this is DiceSimulator.h

#include "Dice.h"

#ifndef _3_01_Dice_Simulator_DiceSimulator_h
#define _3_01_Dice_Simulator_DiceSimulator_h

class DiceSimulator
{
    int numberOfDice;
    int *timesRolled;
public:
    DiceSimulator(const int times, const int numberOfDice);
    int howManyTimesDidWeRollACertainNumber(int number);
};

#endif

You would think that 144414 divided by 1000000 multiplied by 100 is 14.4414, right? How is it possible that this gives a wrong result?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Nawaz, Philipp, Kerrek SB, Sam Miller, Toon Krijthe Mar 26 '12 at 8:46

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
This is impossible. Only try to realise the truth: That it is not division that is broken, but it is only your own code. –  Kerrek SB Mar 25 '12 at 12:31
1  
@KerrekSB: "Only try to realise the truth"... sounds like that little kid from Matrix? :P –  Nawaz Mar 25 '12 at 12:33
1  
Could it be that sim.howManyTimesDidWeRollACertainNumber(11) generates a different number every time you call it? perhaps you should keep the result in a variable prior to the cout –  Yaniro Mar 25 '12 at 12:34
3  
Strive to make your method names shorter – while preserving readability, of course. For instance, I’d suggest occurrencesOf. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 25 '12 at 12:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
int timesRolled[6 * numberOfDice - 2];
// ...
this->timesRolled = timesRolled;

You can't do that. timesRolled is a local variable that will go out of scope at the end of the constructor. Once that happens the memory is no longer valid and accessing any pointer to that memory will lead to undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, so how should I fix that? –  Sander Declerck Mar 25 '12 at 12:52
    
So we have bashphorisms 0, 1 and 2 here? –  Kerrek SB Mar 25 '12 at 12:56
1  
@SanderDeclerck You could allocate the memory using new[] and make sure to delete[] it in the destructor. Or better yet: use std::vector instead of arrays. –  sepp2k Mar 25 '12 at 13:02
    
thanks a lot, that worked! –  Sander Declerck Mar 25 '12 at 13:05
2  
@SanderDeclerck: I'd like to add that it's not necessary to introduce this local variable at all, you can just allocate DiceSimulator::timesRolled right at the beginning of the constructor and then operate on this. Thereby you save having to copy the array at the end of the constructor. –  leftaroundabout Mar 25 '12 at 13:17

Yes, the answer has been given and accepted, but I still don't like this:

int timesRolled[6 * numberOfDice - 2];

for(int i = numberOfDice; i <= 6 * numberOfDice; i++)
{
    timesRolled[i - numberOfDice] = 0;
}

So that if, for instance, numberOfDice is 1, timesRolled is an array with 4 elements, and you fill elements 0 through 5 of it. You may want to look into that later.

share|improve this answer
    
I know, I already changed that to timesRolled = new int[5 * numberOfDice]; –  Sander Declerck Mar 25 '12 at 13:12
    
@Sander That’s horrible code. Use a std::vector here. Don’t use pointers unless you have to. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 25 '12 at 18:51

You should never take your chances on operator precedence. Use parens. They don't cost much. So change the calculation for the third number as follows:

((sim.howManyTimesDidWeRollACertainNumber(11) * 100.0) / times)

If it is still wrong after that then you need to show the code for that function...obviously no one can help you further without that.

share|improve this answer
5  
Parens cost readability. They are utterly useless in OP’s code. There are situations where redundant parentheses can increase readability. But if a programmer has problems with BODMAS then I suggest they go back to prescool. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 25 '12 at 12:40
1  
@Konrad, I don't know offhead whether << or * has higher precedence. I believe it is *. So I would appreciate at least the outer parens. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 25 '12 at 12:44
2  
@Konrad: BODMAS are not universal and those you learned back in preschool won't necessarily be the right ones, so your argument is moot. –  Shautieh Mar 25 '12 at 12:56
1  
@Konrad: Funny how I posted saying you shouldn't take your chances with parens, and then the OP comes in and says he doesn't know the order of precedence. Programming in up to a dozen languages at any time through the year, I, also, do not expect to memorize the long list of precedence tables for every one of them when I can much easier eliminate the question with a few parens here and there. I choose the practical solution. If you wish you can choose to take your chances but I hope I don't have to ever read your code and try to figure it out. –  Ken Thompson Mar 25 '12 at 13:02
1  
@KonradRudolph, Most orders of precedence are universal across most programming languages. There are exceptions though, and just because you think you know it all, that doesn't mean everyone else who reads your code does. Be explicit in your intentions and there will be no room for misinterpretation at some point in the future. –  user420442 Mar 25 '12 at 15:24

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