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My priority queue declared as:

std::priority_queue<*MyClass> queue;

class MyClass {
    bool operator<( const MyClass* m ) const;
}

is not sorting the items in the queue.

What is wrong? I would not like to implement a different (Compare) class.

Answer summary:

The problem is, the pointer addresses are sorted. The only way to avoid this is a class that 'compares the pointers'.

Now implemented as:

std::priority_queue<*MyClass, vector<*MyClass>, MyClass::CompStr > queue;

class MyClass {
    struct CompStr {
        bool operator()(MyClass* m1, MyClass* m2);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I realy can't follow. I give you the answer with an extra separation of concern and I get 2 down votes. Why does MyClass needs to know it being compared with pointer? What about open-closed principle, what are you going to do when you decide you also need a std::priority_que of value types instead of pointers. –  TimW Jun 12 '09 at 12:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Give the que the Compare functor ptr_less.

If you want the ptr_less to be compatible with the rest of the std library (binders, composers, ... ):

template<class T>
struct ptr_less
    : public binary_function<T, T, bool> {  
        bool operator()(const T& left, const T& right) const{
            return ((*left) <( *right));
        }
};

std::priority_queue<MyClass*, vector<MyClass*>, ptr_less<MyClass*> > que;

Otherwise you can get away with the simplified version:

struct ptr_less {
    template<class T>
    bool operator()(const T& left, const T& right) const {
        return ((*left) <( *right));
    }
};

std::priority_queue<MyClass*, vector<MyClass*>, ptr_less > que;
share|improve this answer
    
Can some please tell me what is wrong and why -1, this code is working and is valid C++ code. –  TimW Jun 12 '09 at 11:10
    
It is making it difficult with the template operator and stuff. Still the operator between the two pointers for the specific MyClass must be implemented somewhere. –  Peter Smit Jun 12 '09 at 11:16
    
So my solution is to generic? Of course you need some a way to compare two MyClass objects. Now you need a special operator to compare two MyClass pointers and I need to compare two MyClass objects something that is more natural. –  TimW Jun 12 '09 at 11:21
    
It's certainly more mechanism than is needed for this one case. But in other situations it might be useful that this template works with anything that implements operator*, not just pointers. –  Steve Jessop Jun 12 '09 at 11:21
    
Why does the MyClass need to know its being compared by pointers? It just has to be comparable and the algorithm needs to take pointers if it needs to –  TimW Jun 12 '09 at 11:33

The operator <() you have provided will compare a MyClass object with a pointer to a MyClass object. But your queue contains only pointers (I think). You need a comparison function that takes two pointers as parameters.

All this is based on some suppositions - please post your actual code, using copy and paste.

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Since your priority_queue contains only pointer values, it will use the default comparison operator for the pointers - this will sort them by address which is obviously not what you want. If you change the priority_queue to store the class instances by value, it will use the operator you defined. Or, you will have to provide a comparison function.

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Not sure about the priority queue stuff because I've never used it but to do a straight sort, you can do this:

class A
{
    friend struct ComparePtrToA;
public:
    A( int v=0 ):a(v){}
private:
    int a;
};

struct ComparePtrToA
{
    bool operator()(A* a1, A* a2) {return a1->a < a2->a;}
};

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    vector<A*> someAs;
    someAs.push_back(new A(1));
    someAs.push_back(new A(3));
    someAs.push_back(new A(2));
    sort( someAs.begin(), someAs.end(), ComparePtrToA() );
}

Note the memory leaks, this is only an example...

Further note: This is not intended to be an implementation of priority queue! The vector is simply an example of using the functor I created to compare two objects via their pointers. Although I'm aware of what a priority queue is and roughly how it works, I have never used the STL features that implement them.

Update: I think TimW makes some valid points. I don't know why he was downvoted so much. I think my answer can be improved as follows:

class A
{
public:
    A( int v=0 ):a(v){}
    bool operator<( const A& rhs ) { return a < rhs.a; }
private:
    int a;
};

struct ComparePtrToA
{
    bool operator()(A* a1, A* a2) {return *a1 < *a2;}
};

which is cleaner (especially if you consider having a container of values rather than pointers - no further work would be necessary).

share|improve this answer
1  
I've got to point out this is a really bad method to implement a priority queue, memory leaks and so on aside. If all you want is a sorted array, then fine, but a priority queue has a much different implementation with better performance guarantees for things like getting the first item out and inserting items. –  1800 INFORMATION Jun 12 '09 at 11:22
    
I think he's just using sort() as an example, so that (a) he can present his comparator in working code rather than alone, but (b) he doesn't have to use priority_queue itself, which he says he's not familiar with... –  Steve Jessop Jun 12 '09 at 11:26
    
This answer gave the right function to implement for a Comparer class. It works for my priority queue. Of course I take into account how things are going with my memory. It's not for fun that I need a priority_queue of pointers. –  Peter Smit Jun 12 '09 at 11:29
    
Well as I said but since the question is about priority queues, we wouldn't want someone young and impressionable to come in and see this and think that using a sorted array is really a good method to use for a priority queue –  1800 INFORMATION Jun 13 '09 at 0:15

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