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I'm new to C# and trying to establish a C# db connection. But I'm getting an exception.

ExecuteReader requires an open and available Connection. The connection's current state is closed.

following is the code

public void executeCommand()
{
    SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(connectionString);

    try
    {
        con.Open();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
    }

    SqlDataReader rdr = null;
    SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM Employees", con);

    try
    {
        rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader();
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        throw;
    }

    rdr.Close();
   // rdr.Close();
}

and this is my connection string

public static string connectionString = 
    "Data Source=(local);Initial Catalog=service;User Id='mayooresan';Password='password';";

Thanks for your time in advance.

share|improve this question
2  
You shouldnt have try/catch blocks with nothing in the catch part. Thats the best way to hide exceptions. Always use at least a Debug.writeline(ex); Maybe your connection is not being made, and its silently being catched, so you cant see it .... –  squelos Mar 25 '12 at 12:56
1  
You should remove all of the try/catch blocks from this code. In the first one, you're swallowing the exception. That's a terrible idea. Exceptions contain useful information about why something went wrong. My explicitly ignoring helpful error messages, you deny yourself the ability to fix them. The second one isn't handling the exception in any way, so why bother catching it? As a general rule of thumb, only catch an exception when you are ready to handle that exception. If the context has no means of handling it, don't catch it. Let it bubble up to the parent context. –  David Mar 25 '12 at 13:06
    
Additionally, look into using statements for disposable resources (such as SqlConnection). It basically creates a try/finally block for you, and finally blocks are the proper place to dispose of such resources. Otherwise you can have a resource leak in your application if and when anything fails. (Take particular note of the try/finally construct. Not every try needs a catch. As I said before, there's no need to catch exceptions you're not going to handle. try can have just a finally for disposing resources and reacting to events accordingly.) –  David Mar 25 '12 at 13:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Most probabbly connection object fails to open a connection, but as you are catching it, you can not figure out the error. To be clear:

try
{
   con.Open();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
   MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString()); //ADD THIS STRING FOR DEBUGGING, TO SEE IF THERE IS AN EXCEPTION.
}

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
This helped thanks :) I had a invalid connection string dat was the isue :) –  Jay Mayu Mar 25 '12 at 14:27
    
@MayuMayooresan: you're welcome.. –  Tigran Mar 25 '12 at 14:28

You are catching any exceptions when opening the connection. Most likely the connection is not opening and is throwing an error. Remove the try/catch at the opening of the connection and you will probably see why the connection is not open

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It's obvious why it cannot be opened: because it was never closed. –  Tim Schmelter Mar 25 '12 at 13:07

You don't close the connection and reader when an exception was raised, therefor you need to use the finally-block of a try/catch or the using-statement which closes implicitely:

using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
    using(SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(queryString, connection)
    {
        connection.Open();
        using(SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader())
        {
            while (reader.Read())
            {
                // do something with it
            }
        }
    }
}

Apart from that you should not use empty catch blocks. If a connection cannot be opened, it cannot be used. Then you should log that and throw the exception, but don't act as if nothing had happened.

share|improve this answer

are you debugging the code? if not, you wont be able to see the exception because you don't have anything on your catch

Also I suggest this approach to use on your scenario:

using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
    connection.Open();

    SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(queryString, connection);
    SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader();
    while (reader.Read())
    {
        Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0}", reader[0]));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Try wrapping everything in one try-catch block. As it stands now, if an exception is thrown when you try to open the connection, it will fail silently. Try this code instead:

try
{
    SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(connectionString);
    SqlDataReader rdr = null;
    SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM Employees", con);
    rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader();
}
catch(Exception)
{
    throw;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Or, in this case, just don't use a try/catch block at all. Since the exception isn't being handled, there's no reason to catch it in the first place. –  David Mar 25 '12 at 13:04
    
This leaves him room to add real error-handling later. You should never leave code that can throw exceptions willy-nilly –  hehewaffles Mar 25 '12 at 13:09
    
Who said anything about "willy-nilly"? If he wants to add logic to handle the exceptions, then he can add a try/catch block later. But there's absolutely no point in catching an exception only to re-throw it and do nothing else. If the code in the current context isn't in a position to handle the exception, then it shouldn't catch it. Let the exception bubble up to a context that can handle it. Throwing exceptions isn't a bad thing. Catching them for no reason is. –  David Mar 25 '12 at 13:15

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