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Do Interfaces solve the Deadly Diamond Of Death problem?

I don't think so, for example:

// A class implementing two interfaces Interface1 and Interface2.
// Interface1 has int x=10 and Interface2 has int x = 20

public class MultipleInterface implements Interface1, Interface2{

    public void getX(){
        System.out.println(x);
    }
}

Here we get an ambiguous x.

Though Interfaces are a good answer for solving method ambiguity, I guess they fail in the case of variables?

Am I correct? If I am missing something, enlighten me. :D

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5  
There is no diamond here... –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 25 '12 at 14:17
    
ok, I was confused. I agree there's no diamond here since the interfaces are obviously not inheriting those values of x from anywhere. So, I guess interfaces do provide some good solutions against the diamond problem. But what about the ambiguity problem of int x above? –  Biman Tripathy Mar 26 '12 at 17:51
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Java resists the multiple Concrete/abstract class inheritance but not multiple interface inheritance where you inherit abstract methods not implementation the better post with good explaination and examples http://www.tech-knowledgy.com/interfaces-sovles-diamond-death/

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very useful link. It solves my query. So I get it as, even though diamonds can occur in case of interfaces, there will be no diamond of death. Thanks :) –  Biman Tripathy Mar 31 '12 at 16:53
    
yes because Java is from the root not designed for Multiple Inheritance as there is only one super parent Object in Java, therefore Java solves this by Multiple Interface Inhertance –  Rizwan Apr 5 '12 at 13:15
1  
The link is broken. –  Ted Hopp Oct 9 '13 at 19:50
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When a class inherits two variables from parent interfaces, Java insists that any use of the variable name in question be fully qualified. This solves the problem. See the Java Language Specification Section 8.3:

It is possible for a class to inherit more than one field with the same name. Such a situation does not in itself cause a compile-time error. However, any attempt within the body of the class to refer to any such field by its simple name will result in a compile-time error, because such a reference is ambiguous.

A similar statement applies with respect to interfaces (JLS §9.3).

The sample code in the answer by Óscar López is excellent. Here's another example:

class Base {
    int x = 10;
}

interface Interface {
    int x = 20;
}

class SingleInheritance implements Interface {
    int y = 2 * x; // ok
}

class MultipleInheritance extends Base implements Interface {
    int y = 2 * x; // compile-time error
    int z = 2 * Interface.x; // ok
}

void aMethod(MultipleInheritance  arg) {
    System.out.println("arg.x = " + arg.x); // compile-time error
    System.out.println("x = " + Interface.x); // ok
}

EDIT: Java 8 screws this up for methods; an interface now can declare both default methods and static method implementations. This brings a large chunk of the Diamond of Death problem into the language.

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2  
Could you show with code what you mean? To my knowledge variables cannot be inherited from interfaces. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Mar 25 '12 at 14:22
    
I think Oscar spelled it out perfectly. –  duffymo Mar 25 '12 at 14:26
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No, you don't. Interfaces don't have any variables, other than static final ones.

If you actually write, compile, and execute those interfaces and classes you'll have your answer. That x variable is not a class member, so there's no ambiguity.

This is one of those questions that you can easily answer for yourself by writing the code and letting the JDK tell you. It'll be faster than asking here.

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1  
Completely agree with you. But since I asked this question here, I got some very good points like, using import static, and using enumeration rather than constants in interface(as mentioned by other users). Don't u think I got something EXTRA to learn? & don't u think this is going to help me or somebody else? I am not trying to waste somebody's time here. If anybody feels like they can share some knowledge with me, they should... otherwise, simply ignore my question. People like me, who are beginners in programming need help from great programmers like u, sir. Please encourage us to ask :) –  Biman Tripathy Mar 26 '12 at 16:19
    
You don't get to control how I answer any more than I can control what you ask. I don't encourage or discourage questions; I just offer my opinion for your consideration. Please leave the attitude at the door, Biman. Thanks. –  duffymo Mar 26 '12 at 16:53
    
Advice taken :-) I hope u too consider taking my advice as positively as I took urs. Peace :-) –  Biman Tripathy Mar 26 '12 at 17:41
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An interface can't have attributes. When you write this:

public interface Foo {
    int x;
}

Under the hood it implicitly gets converted to a constant, something like this:

public interface Foo {
    public static final int x;
}

Let's say you have another interface with a similarly named constant:

public interface Bar {
    int x;
}

And if you were to use the x value in a class that implements both Foo and Bar you'll have to qualify those constants, leaving no room for ambiguities, like this:

public class Baz implements Foo, Bar {
    private int y = Foo.x + Bar.x;
}

So no diamond in here. Anyway, declaring constants in an interface is frowned upon nowadays, most of the time you're better off using an enumeration for the same effect.

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1  
+1 - a very nice answer, indeed. –  duffymo Mar 25 '12 at 14:35
    
If a constant declared in an interface is a useful object and not simply an int value, then using an enum isn't particularly convenient. The real error, I think, is using implements instead of import static to bring constant names into the local name space. (With legacy code, though, you just have to work with what you inherit (so to speak).) –  Ted Hopp Mar 25 '12 at 14:50
    
@TedHopp Agreed. for simple cases (int constants) an enum might be a better idea, for more complex values import static is the way to go, but I'd rather define my constants in a class and not an interface, it can be confusing as is evidenced by this question –  Óscar López Mar 25 '12 at 14:53
1  
@ Oscar @TedHopp Very good examples....Thanks –  Biman Tripathy Mar 26 '12 at 6:54
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Deadly Diamond Of Death Problem.

class A
{
void eat()
{

}
}

class B and C extend A and Override eat() method

class B extends A
{
void eat()
{
}
}


class C extends A
{
void eat()
{
}
}

now if we have multiple Inheritance what will Happen in following case.

 class D extends B ,C
{
//which eat() method will be inherited here for class D ? a problem  ? ?
}
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The Deadly Diamond of Death is a problem with variables, but an even bigger problem with virtual methods. If classes Moo1 and Moo2 were to both inherit from class Foo and override abstract virtual function Bar, and if a class Zoo were allowed to inherit from Moo1 and Moo2, without having to add its own override of Bar, it it would be unclear what method Bar of a Zoo should do. Interfaces avoid that issue by requiring that every class that implements an interface must supply its own implementation for all of the interface members, and by specifying that all members of an interface will be considered identical in all interfaces which extend it directly or indirectly. Thus, in the above situation, if Foo, etc. were interfaces rather than classes, then any class which implements Zoo would be required to implement Foo.Bar, which would be synonymous with Moo1.Bar, Moo2.Bar, and Zoo.Bar.

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