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I tried the below code to check whether my mobile is connected to a wireless network and it works well when I want to know if my mobile is connected to the network, but it fails to give information about the internet access ... something like "Pinging" any website. Actually I followed many links but still no answer, so I'll be so thankful if anybody can help.

Thanks in Advance.

@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.main);

    Toast t = new Toast(getApplicationContext());

    if (isInternetOn()) {
         // INTERNET IS AVAILABLE, DO STUFF..
         Toast.makeText(ConnectivityTestActivity.this,"Network is Available", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();

         }
    else {
         // NO INTERNET AVAILABLE, DO STUFF..
        Toast.makeText(ConnectivityTestActivity.this,"No Network Available", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();

        }
}

public final boolean isInternetOn() {


    ConnectivityManager connec =  (ConnectivityManager)getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
    // ARE WE CONNECTED TO THE NET
    if ( connec.getNetworkInfo(0).getState() == NetworkInfo.State.CONNECTED ||
    connec.getNetworkInfo(0).getState() == NetworkInfo.State.CONNECTING ||
    connec.getNetworkInfo(1).getState() == NetworkInfo.State.CONNECTING ||
    connec.getNetworkInfo(1).getState() == NetworkInfo.State.CONNECTED ) {
    // MESSAGE TO SCREEN FOR TESTING (IF REQ)
    //Toast.makeText(this, connectionType + ” connected”, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
    return true;
    } else if ( connec.getNetworkInfo(0).getState() == NetworkInfo.State.DISCONNECTED ||  connec.getNetworkInfo(1).getState() == NetworkInfo.State.DISCONNECTED  ) {

    return false;
    }
    return false;
    }}
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marked as duplicate by Peter O., Bill the Lizard Apr 15 '13 at 13:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Actually I used the same function isInternetOn() but I removed the connecting condition. It had to check the status of connection if connected or not and if it is trying to connect. This didn't work for me, so I removed connecting status checking and then it worked.

Thanks for all replies.

public final boolean isInternetOn()
{
  ConnectivityManager connec = (ConnectivityManager)
    getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);

  // ARE WE CONNECTED TO THE NET
  if ( connec.getNetworkInfo(0).getState() == NetworkInfo.State.CONNECTED ||
       connec.getNetworkInfo(1).getState() == NetworkInfo.State.CONNECTED )
  {
    // MESSAGE TO SCREEN FOR TESTING (IF REQ)
    //Toast.makeText(this, connectionType + ” connected”, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
    return true;
  }
  else if ( connec.getNetworkInfo(0).getState() == NetworkInfo.State.DISCONNECTED
    ||  connec.getNetworkInfo(1).getState() == NetworkInfo.State.DISCONNECTED  )
  {
    return false;
  }

  return false;
}
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3  
Just a note ... I used the above code from another question here in stackoverflow.com, we may use 'ConnectivityManager.Type_WIFI' or 'ConnectivityManager.Type_Mobile' instead of 0 & 1 in the getNetworkInfo() –  Amt87 Apr 2 '12 at 8:18
1  
Why did you even need the else if part? If we are not conected that means we are disconnected. Can you please let me know if there is any use of this else if part? –  Adil Malik Feb 8 '13 at 16:05
1  
It might be CONNECTED, DISCONNECTED, CONNECTING, DISCONNECTING, SUSPENDED and UNKNOWN. You can check theses states in developer.android.com or when you click ctrl+space after (NetworkInfo.State.) in your code. I wish this can be helpful. –  Amt87 Feb 10 '13 at 7:47
1  
But in your case, if the if condition fails. The else condition will be evaluated, now wheather the else condition passes or fails in both cases we are returning false. Then why do we need else condition in above case? That was my point. Any ways Good Info in your last comment. –  Adil Malik Feb 10 '13 at 17:47
    
I see :) . Actually I want it to return false only when it is DISCONNECTED –  Amt87 Feb 11 '13 at 6:32

see the sample:

public static boolean isWifiEnabled() {
    if ( !gWifiManager.isWifiEnabled()) {

        if (mCanShowWifiToast) {
            new Thread(mWifiToastControl).start();
            G.gHandler.post(mNoWifiRunnable);
        }

        return false;
    } else {
        int linkspeed = gWifiManager.getConnectionInfo().getLinkSpeed();
        if (linkspeed < 5) {
            if (mCanShowWifiToast) {
                new Thread(mWifiToastControl).start();
                G.gHandler.post(mNoWifiRunnable);
            }

            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}
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You can use BroadcastReceivers that will trigger when the connection status change: there is a similar question with an answer: Broadcast intents for bluetooth, wifi and ringer mode

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