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I am writing this code that one function calls itself recursively. But I am stuck in an infinite loop because it seems when the function returns it doesn't return to the end bracket of the while loop but it returns to where int o is define.. any idea where the problem could be?

ErrorCode QuadTree::PartialSearchHelper(Key *key, const uint64_t QInternal, Iterator ** records,int l[], int pow) {
    try {
        uint64_t temp=(&indexVec[QInternal])->Firstchild;
        uint64_t ch = (&indexVec[QInternal])->Firstchild;
        for (int i = 0; i < pow; i++) {
            while (!(&indexVec[temp + l[i]])->isLeaf) {
                int o= l[i]; //it returns here after finishing recursion call!!!!!!!!!
                PartialSearchHelper(key, temp + l[i], records, l, pow);
            }                        
            ((&indexVec[temp + l[i]]))->findPartial(key, records);
        }

    } catch (std::bad_alloc &e) {
        throw (kErrorOutOfMemory);
    } catch (ErrorCode &e) {
        throw (e);
    } catch (...) {
        throw (kErrorGenericFailure);
    }
    return kOk;
}
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5  
At some point, this may cause a stack overflow. –  01100110 Mar 25 '12 at 15:12
    
"but it returns to where int o is define.. " oh no it doesn't. –  Stephane Rolland Mar 25 '12 at 15:14
1  
Why do (&indexVec[temp+l[i]])->, when you can just do indexVec[temp+l[i]].? –  user420442 Mar 25 '12 at 15:14
2  
If your while condition is still true, of course it will "return" there (i.e. wrap around and stay in the while loop). That is not the cause of your problem, semantics of your code are. Have you triple-checked your while-loop condition? –  Irfy Mar 25 '12 at 15:17
    
thnks but I tired inserting a break point at while condition but seems it doesn't even passes by!!!!!!!1 –  shaklasah Mar 25 '12 at 15:20
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You are not changing any value inside the while, so it just restarts the while, in the lower level call

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Each recursive function call returns exactly to where it is called. Since you're in a while loop, you evidently continue with the next iteration.

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Inside the while loop there is no counter, there isn't any value changing. for instance, let's take a very basic example:

int i = 0;
while(i<5) 
{
  do.Something();
}

At this point, "i" will always be less than 5, so it will never stop. In the other hand, if you change it to something like this:

int i = 0;
while(i<5)
{
  do.Something();
  i=i++
}

The i value would increase by one every time it ran. If the while loop is inside a for loop, the while loop needs to be entirely done to loop back to the for loop. Try to use a for loop inside a for loop or insert some kind of counter in the while loop.

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Seriously, i = i++? Never mind the missing semicolon, have you thought about what happens when you assign and post-increment the same variable? –  alexis Sep 12 '12 at 20:12
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