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CSS has never supported constants or variables directly. Whenever I'm writing code like this:

span.class1 {
  color: #377fb6;
}

div.class2 {
  border: solid 1px #377fb6; /* Repeated color */
}

I wonder why such a seemingly simple feature has never made it into the standard. What could be hard about implementing a scheme whereby we could avoid repetition, something like this:

$theme_color1: #377fb6;

span.class1 {
  color: $theme_color1;
}

div.class2 {
  border: solid 1px $theme_color1;
}

I know there are workarounds, like using a class for each color or generating CSS code from templates, but my question is: given that CSS is so rich and complex, why weren't CSS constants ever introduced?

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closed as not constructive by Mat, mu is too short, mah, sandeep, tvanfosson Mar 28 '12 at 13:47

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I assume you've heard of LESS, SASS et al, but want to know why constants were never introduced into vanilla CSS? –  Bojangles Mar 25 '12 at 17:23
    
Yes, it seems some people were opposed to it. But be careful what you ask for... oocss.org/spec/css-variables.html –  Mr Lister Mar 25 '12 at 17:23
    
@JamWaffles I'm aware there are alternatives, but, yes, I'm asking about vanilla CSS. –  Adiel Mittmann Mar 25 '12 at 17:24
    
Of course it supports constants. Those repeated colors you're using there? Magic constants. (OK, I'll shut up.) –  BoltClock Mar 25 '12 at 17:24
    
@BoltClock Ooh, you were soo close... you could have said colors like "DarkGoldenRod" or border widths like "thin". –  Mr Lister Mar 25 '12 at 17:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

EDIT: This was already questioned to Håkon Wium Lie, the father of CSS (Opera Watchblog (Wayback machine)):

Bernie Zimmermann: Håkon, why doesn't CSS support constants? Being able to assign an RGB value to a constant, for instance, could make stylesheet maintenance a lot more manageable. Was it just an oversight?

Hakon: No, we thought about it. True, it would have saved some typing. However, there are also some downsides. First, the CSS syntax would have been more complex and more programming-like. Second, what would be the scope of the constant? The file? The document? Why? In the end we decided it wasn't worth it.

So it's not in the standard because they thought it wasn't worth it.


Constants or variables as you have defined are merely placeholders. Since such a placeholder makes only sense if it's used on the same declaration it's useless as grouping already provides this mechanism:

When several selectors share the same declarations, they may be grouped into a comma-separated list.CSS2:Grouping

So instead of using a color in ten selectors, it's often better to collect common declarations and put them together. Instead of

.header{
    color: red;
}
.section:nth-of-type(2n) > .ridi.culous > .article:hover{
    color: red;
}
.footer{
    color: blue;
    border: 1px solid blue;
}

use

/* Color definitions */
.header,
.section:nth-of-type(2n) > .ridi.culous > .article:hover{
    color: red;
}

.footer{
    color: blue;
}

/* border definitions */
.footer{
    border: 1px solid;
}

Also use inheritance whenever possible.

Note that you can declare almost some kind of variable if you're using abstract/simple classes like

.margin5em{
    margin: 5em;
}
.corporateIdentityBackgroundColor{
    background-color: #881200;
}
.corporateIdentityBackgroundImage{
    background-image: url(we/are/awesome/corporation);
}
.backgroundCenter{
    background-position: center center;
}
.backgroundNoRepeat{
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
}

This will enable you to use

<div class="corporateIdentityBackgroundImage backgroundCenter backgroundNoRepeat">Ridiculos long class names</div>
<div class="article">
  <p class="margin5em">Yesterday I found a new hobby: Creating class names that are longer then most common words.</p>
</div>

See also:

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Now that's the kind of answer I was looking for. The why :) If the father of CSS explains why, that's good enough for me! –  Adiel Mittmann Mar 25 '12 at 18:03
    
@AdielMittmann: See also this essay from Bert Bos, who is the co-author of Lie's book Cascading Style Sheets – designing for the Web. –  Zeta Mar 25 '12 at 18:11

Zeta’s answer is quite excellent—it certainly got my upvote—but I wanted to drop a note that a Working Draft for “CSS Variables” (constants with another name) was published just ten days ago:

http://dev.w3.org/csswg/css-variables/

I wouldn’t get too worked up about it as yet, since I suspect it will undergo changes and it’ll be a while before support is widespread. Still, there’s at least some movement in this direction.

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why weren't CSS constants ever introduced?

CSS is not a programming language that's why. You could use LESS or SCSS to have variables.

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1  
But is that the reason why? Purists were against introducing constants into CSS because it's not a programming language? Notice that I'm not even asking for variables, expressions and functions -- only constants. –  Adiel Mittmann Mar 25 '12 at 17:31

There's an argument for Colour Constants (we have a handful of predefined colour constants already anyway). Variables however lead to If statements, If statements lead to Functions, Functions lead to Javascript (and doobies).

Though this article shows exactly how unnecessary a colour constant is in reality. If you're planning on making a theme colour place all your theme colour declarations in one statement, or as has been mentioned make a class just for your theme colour. The former does require splitting the selector definition however which doesn't smell nice, and the latter does seem extraneous when you already have a class applied to the tag.

I see no need for other Constants in a well designed sheet. Numerous dimensional repetition indicates poor structure/design.

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