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I need to read a file of integers into an array. I have it working with this:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "io"
    "os"
)

func readFile(filePath string) (numbers []int) {
    fd, err := os.Open(filePath)
    if err != nil {
        panic(fmt.Sprintf("open %s: %v", filePath, err))
    }
    var line int
    for {

        _, err := fmt.Fscanf(fd, "%d\n", &line)

        if err != nil {
            fmt.Println(err)
            if err == io.EOF {
                return
            }
            panic(fmt.Sprintf("Scan Failed %s: %v", filePath, err))

        }
        numbers = append(numbers, line)
    }
    return
}

func main() {
    numbers := readFile("numbers.txt")
    fmt.Println(len(numbers))
}

The file numbers.txt is just:

1
2
3
...

ReadFile() seems too long (maybe because of the error handing).

Is there a shorter / more Go idiomatic way to load a file?

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4  
You're missing fd.Close(). Add a defer fd.Close() as line two of readFile. –  Mostafa Mar 25 '12 at 19:20
1  
Place the 'defer fd.Close()' after the error checking. You will get runtime panics from this line when the file read fails because fd is nil. Check for the error first, then defer your close. You won't need to close anyway if you failed to open. –  burfl Jul 18 '13 at 12:51
1  
To clarify, this is because defers are evaluated immediately and executed later. So when you try to defer fd.Close() on a nil fd (which has no methods) you will get a panic. 'x := 2; defer fmt.Print(x); x = 3' will print '2', not 3. –  burfl Jul 18 '13 at 12:59

3 Answers 3

Using a bufio.Scanner makes things nice. I've also used an io.Reader rather than taking a filename. Often that's a good technique, since it allows the code to be used on any file-like object and not just a file on disk. Here it's "reading" from a string.

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "fmt"
    "io"
    "strconv"
    "strings"
)

// ReadInts reads whitespace-separated ints from r. If there's an error, it
// returns the ints successfully read so far as well as the error value.
func ReadInts(r io.Reader) ([]int, error) {
    scanner := bufio.NewScanner(r)
    scanner.Split(bufio.ScanWords)
    var result []int
    for scanner.Scan() {
        x, err := strconv.Atoi(scanner.Text())
        if err != nil {
            return result, err
        }
        result = append(result, x)
    }
    return result, scanner.Err()
}

func main() {
    tf := "1\n2\n3\n4\n5\n6"
    ints, err := ReadInts(strings.NewReader(tf))
    fmt.Println(ints, err)
}
share|improve this answer

I would do it like this:

package main

import (
"fmt"
    "io/ioutil"
    "strconv"
    "strings"
)

// It would be better for such a function to return error, instead of handling
// it on their own.
func readFile(fname string) (nums []int, err error) {
    b, err := ioutil.ReadFile(fname)
    if err != nil { return nil, err }

    lines := strings.Split(string(b), "\n")
    // Assign cap to avoid resize on every append.
    nums = make([]int, 0, len(lines))

    for i, l := range lines {
        // Empty line occurs at the end of the file when we use Split.
        if len(l) == 0 { continue }
        // Atoi better suits the job when we know exactly what we're dealing
        // with. Scanf is the more general option.
        n, err := strconv.Atoi(l)
        if err != nil { return nil, err }
        nums = append(nums, n)
    }

    return nums, nil
}

func main() {
    nums, err := readFile("numbers.txt")
    if err != nil { panic(err) }
    fmt.Println(len(nums))
}
share|improve this answer
    
In my opinion, the "Assign cap to avoid resize on every append" isn't avoiding the resize because a resize of []string is hidden somewhere in strings.Split. –  Atom Mar 26 '12 at 7:12
    
No, strings.Split first finds number of occurrences of sep and uses that number for allocation. See genSplit. –  Mostafa Mar 26 '12 at 7:40
    
Indeed, but strings.Split is doing it at the cost of going through the string twice - I didn't expect that. In any case, it isn't true that append resizes on every append. –  Atom Mar 26 '12 at 8:06
    
Right. Do you know append's behavior with reallocation? I also guess that it may allocate bigger than what is needed right now, but don't know how much bigger. Does anybody know where can we find it in the source code? –  Mostafa Mar 26 '12 at 8:51
    
Source code: function runtime·growslice in weekly.golang.org/src/pkg/runtime/slice.c, argument n is the number of elements to append (such as: n=1). –  Atom Mar 26 '12 at 9:00

Your solution with fmt.Fscanf is fine. There are certainly a number of other ways to do though, depending on your situation. Mostafa's technique is one I use a lot (although I might allocate the result all at once with make. oops! scratch that. He did.) but for ultimate control you should learn bufio.ReadLine. See go readline -> string for some example code.

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