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I've tried to put together a solution from similar questions but have failed miserably. I just don't know enough about Python yet :(

I have an inputlist containing elements in a particular order ex: ["GRE", "KIN", "ERD", "KIN"]

I have a datafile containing the elements, plus other data ex:

"ERD","Data","Data"...  
"KIN","Data","Data"...  
"FAC","Data","Data"...  
"GRE","Data","Data"...  

I need to create an outputlist that contains the lines from the datafile in the order they appear in the inputlist.

The code below returns the outputlist in the order the appear in the datafile, which is not the intended behavior... :-\

with open(inputfile, 'r') as f:
    names = [line.strip() for line in f]

outputlist = []

with open(datafile, 'r') as f:
    for line in f:
        name = line.split(',')[0]
        if name[1:-1] in names: 
            outputlist.append(line)
    output = open(outputfile, 'w')
    output.writelines(outputlist)

How can I have it return the list in the proper order? Thanks in advance for your help :-)

Edit

Thank's to Oscar, this is the solution I implemented:

datafile = 'C:\\testing\\bldglist.txt'
inputfile = 'C:\\testing\\inputlist.txt'
outputfile = "C:\\testing\\output.txt"

with open(inputfile, 'r') as f:
    inputlist = [line.strip() for line in f]

def outputList(inputlist, datafile, outputfile):
    d = {}
    with open(datafile, 'r') as f:
        for line in f:
            line = line.strip()
            key = line.split(',')[0]
            d[key] = line
    with open(outputfile, 'w') as f:
        f.write('"Abbrev","Xcoord","Ycoord"\n')
        for key in inputlist:
            f.write(d[key] + '\n')

outputList(inputlist, datafile, outputfile)
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2  
How big is the data file? If it easily fits into memory, you could build a dictionary from the data file first. –  Sven Marnach Mar 25 '12 at 17:52
1  
And if it doesn't, there's shelve. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 25 '12 at 17:55
    
These are all very small text files, just 164 lines in datafile –  Steve S Mar 25 '12 at 18:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming a data file with this format:

"ERD","Data","Data"...  
"KIN","Data","Data"...  
"FAC","Data","Data"...  
"GRE","Data","Data"... 

Try this solution:

def outputList(inputlist, datafile, outputfile):
    d = {}
    with open(datafile, 'r') as f:
        for line in f:
            line = line.lstrip()
            key = line.split(',')[0]
            d[key] = line
    with open(outputfile, 'w') as f:
        for key in inputlist:
            f.write(d[key])

Use it like this:

outputList(['"GRE"', '"KIN"', '"ERD"', '"KIN"'],
           '/path/to/datafile',
           '/path/to/outputfile')

It will write the output file with the expected order.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. I tweaked my question slightly. I used A,B,C,D as examples to make the order issue easier to see. The lines start actually with 3 letter codes like you see there now. –  Steve S Mar 25 '12 at 18:29
    
@SteveS my solution works the same, it doesn't matter if the codes are one or three characters long –  Óscar López Mar 25 '12 at 18:31
1  
Got it working! Beautiful. Thanks again :) –  Steve S Mar 25 '12 at 18:58
    
You could avoid adding the newline if you wouldn't have stripped it in the first place... Maybe you should use lstrip instead? –  Niklas B. Mar 25 '12 at 19:38
    
@NiklasB. OK, edited my answer with your suggestion. Mind removing the downvote? –  Óscar López Mar 25 '12 at 22:05

This is the easy solution. It reads the entire input file into memory as a dictionary of first letter: line. It's then easy to write the lines in the write order.

If the file is very large (gigabytes) or you don't have a lot of memory, there are other ways. But they're not nearly as nice.

I haven't tested this.

import csv

data = {}
with open(datafile) as f:
    for line in csv.reader(f):
        data[line[0]] = line

with open(outputfile, "w") as f:
    f = csv.writer(f)
    for entry in inputlist:
        f.writerow(data[entry])
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. I've modified my question slightly. I used A,B,C,D as examples to make the order issue easier to see. The lines start actually with 3 letter codes like you see there now. When I ran your code with my data it returned KeyError: '"PAR"' –  Steve S Mar 25 '12 at 18:26
    
Thanks, Niklas. I ended up successfully implementing Oscar's solution, but this one has more votes. Out of curiosity, what makes this one preferable? –  Steve S Mar 25 '12 at 19:02
    
@Steve S: This one was first, the other answer basically copied it (at least it uses the exact same logic). This answer is actually better because it uses a proper CSV parser. I fixed a small bug in this version, so you can use it as well if you want. –  Niklas B. Mar 25 '12 at 19:37

1) Create a list with the elements you wish to map to. In this case, ["GRE", "KIN", "ERD", "FAC"]

2) Read the file and map (using a dictionary of lists) the first elements.

3) Output to a file.

import csv

out_index=["GRE", "KIN", "ERD", "FAC"]
d={}
with open('/Users/andrew/bin/SO/abcd.txt','r') as fr:
    for e in csv.reader(fr):
        if e[0] not in d: d[e[0]]=[]
        for ea in e[1:]:
            d[e[0]].append(ea)

for i in out_index:
    print i,":"
    for e in d[i]:
        print '   ',e

Given this example data:

"ERD","Data-a1","Data-a2"
"KIN","Data-b1","Data-b2"
"FAC","Data-c1","Data-c2"
"GRE","Data-d1","Data-d2"
"ERD","Data-a3","Data-a4"
"GRE","Data-d3","Data-d4"

Output:

GRE :
    Data-d1
    Data-d2
    Data-d3
    Data-d4
KIN :
    Data-b1
    Data-b2
ERD :
    Data-a1
    Data-a2
    Data-a3
    Data-a4
FAC :
    Data-c1
    Data-c2

Done!

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