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Program runs once and it both throws data to the pipe and gets it out in the same condition that should be mutually exclusive (in if and else). What I don't get here? How does that work? I have no experience with this kind of programming.

   #include <sys/types.h>
     #include <unistd.h>
     #include <stdio.h>
     #include <stdlib.h>

Read characters from the pipe and echo them to stdout.

     void
     read_from_pipe (int file)
     {
       FILE *stream;
       int c;
       stream = fdopen (file, "r");
       while ((c = fgetc (stream)) != EOF)
         putchar (c);
       fclose (stream);
     }

Write some random text to the pipe.

     void
     write_to_pipe (int file)
     {
       FILE *stream;
       stream = fdopen (file, "w");
       fprintf (stream, "hello, world!\n");
       fprintf (stream, "goodbye, world!\n");
       fclose (stream);
     }

     int
     main (void)
     {
       pid_t pid;
       int mypipe[2];

       /* Create the pipe. */
       if (pipe (mypipe))
         {
           fprintf (stderr, "Pipe failed.\n");
           return EXIT_FAILURE;
         }

       /* Create the child process. */
       pid = fork ();
       if (pid == (pid_t) 0)
         {
           /* This is the child process.
              Close other end first. */
           close (mypipe[1]);
           read_from_pipe (mypipe[0]);
           return EXIT_SUCCESS;
         }
       else if (pid < (pid_t) 0)
         {
           /* The fork failed. */
           fprintf (stderr, "Fork failed.\n");
           return EXIT_FAILURE;
         }
       else
         {
           /* This is the parent process.
              Close other end first. */
           close (mypipe[0]);
           write_to_pipe (mypipe[1]);
           return EXIT_SUCCESS;
         }
     }
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Right after the line that says:

pid = fork();

You no longer have one program, but two distinct ones (when fork succeeds).

It's not the same program that runs both. In the child process, fork returns 0, but in the parent it returns the child PID.

The parent runs one branch of the if/else construct, the child runs another. (And a third is run, in the parent only, if fork fails.)

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Which part of this code decides how many programs I will have running together? is it enough to change int mypipe[2]; to int mypipe[3]; in order to have 3 of them? –  user1291641 Mar 25 '12 at 18:54
    
No, not at all. pipe doesn't create processes, fork does. You get a new process each time you call fork. Be very careful with that and read the docs - if you end up calling fork in a loop or not being careful about what code you run in the child vs in the parent, you might end up with a "fork bomb". (Read up on that too.) –  Mat Mar 25 '12 at 18:59

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