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class Base{
//...
    public:
    int get()const{ // const
    // Do something.
     }
    int get(int x){
    // Do Someting.
     }

    //...

};
class Derived:public Base{
//....
     public:
     int get(){ // not const (not the same signature as the one is the base class) 
     //Dosomething
     }
      //...

};

I know that get() in Derived class will hide get() and get(int x) methods inside Base class. so My question is:
1) is this consedred overloading or overriding ?
2) does making get() const in the derived class will change something about (hiding or not hiding Base class methods).

Quote from a c++ book:

"It is a common mistake to hide a base class method when you intend to override it, by forgetting to include the keyword const. const is part of the signature, and leaving it off changes the signature, and thus hides the method rather than overrides it. "

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second get in base missed the return type –  stefan bachert Mar 25 '12 at 18:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is neither overloading nor overriding. Rather, it is hiding.

If the other function were also visible, it would be overloading, which you can achieve with using:

class Derived  : public Base
{
public:
    using Base::get;
    int get();
};

Even if you declared int get() const in the derived class, it would merely be hiding the base function, since the base function is not virtual.

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1)so the only case of overriding is making the get function visible in Derived class ? <br/> 2) would not this give me an error because it's multiple definition ? –  AlexDan Mar 25 '12 at 19:06
    
@AlexDan: No, the only way to override is to make get virtual and then declare another function in Derived with the same signature. –  Kerrek SB Mar 25 '12 at 19:08
    
what about the method you mentioned earlier, with 'using' keyword. is this concedred overriding? and can you explain to me what's the use of the keyword 'using' inside the Derived class . and sorry all this question. thnks –  AlexDan Mar 25 '12 at 19:12
    
@AlexDan: Oh dear, I'm sorry, that was a typo: I meant to say "overloading". With using, you allow both overloads to be visible. Fixed. –  Kerrek SB Mar 25 '12 at 19:14
  1. Neither, it's just "hiding".

  2. No. Hiding occurs based on function name, not on function signature.

Your quote is only relevant if you've declared the base-class functions virtual; you cannot override a non-virtual function.

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I read in a book this: Quote " It is a common mistake to hide a base class method when you intend to override it, by forgetting to include the keyword const. const is part of the signature, and leaving it off changes the signature, and thus hides the method rather than overrides it. " can you explain it to me. thanks –  AlexDan Mar 25 '12 at 18:55
    
@AlexDan: See my updated answer. –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 25 '12 at 18:55

Overloading is a function named the same, but with a different signature.

Overriding is overriding a signature that already exist.

You have just "hidden", which is neither.

A quick google search reveals this: http://users.soe.ucsc.edu/~charlie/book/notes/chap7/sld012.htm which you may find helpful.

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Overriding also requires the base function to be virtual. –  Kerrek SB Mar 25 '12 at 19:00

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