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I have a file I'm writing to, but I need to lock it first (using flock()), to prevent any other script from writing to it. So I have:

$file=fopen($file_p);

if (flock($file, LOCK_EX)) {//lock was successful
    fwrite($file,$write_contents);          
}

But I need to check if it's already locked, to prevent other scripts from writing to it.

How can I do this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would check to see if I couldn't obtain a lock on the file, like this:

if (!flock($file, LOCK_EX)) {
    throw new Exception(sprintf('Unable to obtain lock on file: %s', $file));
}

fwrite($file, $write_contents);
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This is incorrect. If you don't specify the LOCK_NB bitmask on the operation passed to flock, then by default, this function will block until the requested lock is acquired (source). With the example code you've given, flock will not return false to indicate a lock has been taken out on the file by another process, but will simply wait until that process releases its lock. –  Mark Amery Jun 22 at 20:29
    
@MarkAmery: Incorrect how? The logic is simple, If you cannot obtain an exclusive lock on the file, then throw the exception. It's up to the calling code to figure out how to handle the exception. –  Mike Purcell Jun 22 at 21:19
    
No - in the case that the reason for being unable to acquire the lock is that another process holds it, your comment above does not match how your code behaves. Instead the behaviour your code has is "If you cannot obtain an exclusive lock on the file, keep waiting until you can, then continue." - this is flock's default behaviour. You need to use the LOCK_NB modifier, as shown in Ryan Y's answer, to make your code behave the way that your comment describes. –  Mark Amery Jun 23 at 11:19
    
That's what I am saying, I am ok with waiting until I can obtain an EXCLUSIVE lock on the file. For example, if you implement a queue based processing algorithm where 12-14 parallel processes can be running at the same time, each needing to write to the same file (i.e. log file), then I want to ensure each process obtains the exclusive lock, if it cannot, then wait until it can. I've never run into a situation where the wait time became an issue. –  Mike Purcell Jun 23 at 14:09
    
sure, but that's not an answer to the question the OP asked, which was how to check if the file is already locked. As I initially understood both your answer and your previous comment, you were saying that your code would perform that check and throw the exception if another process holds the lock. It sounds like it wasn't your intent to imply this, but offering the snippet above as an answer to "How do I check if a file is already locked?" without noting that you're offering an alternative approach is misleading. –  Mark Amery Jun 23 at 14:19

As described in the docs, use LOCK_NB to make a non-blocking attempt to obtain the lock, and on failure check the $wouldblock argument to see if something else holds the lock.

if (!flock($fp, LOCK_EX|LOCK_NB, $wouldblock)) {
    if ($wouldblock) {
        // something already has a lock
    }
    else {
        // couldn't lock for some other reason
    }
}
else {
    // lock obtained
}
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Your flock call is the check to see if it's already locked. If it's locked, that if() statement would fail, so you could just throw an else on it with something like:

if (flock($file, LOCK_EX)) {//lock was successful
    fwrite($file,$write_contents);
} else {
    echo "$file is locked.";
}
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AHHH, so it returns false if the file is already locked? –  user849137 Mar 25 '12 at 19:20
    
This is incorrect; see my comment on Mike Purcell's pretty-much-identical answer. –  Mark Amery Jun 22 at 20:41

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