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I can make a variable's name from two variables' value:

$a = 'tea';
$b = 'pot';
$tea_pot = 'Too Hot';

Here if I print or echo ${$a.'_'.$b}, I will get 'Too Hot' as output.

Similarly I need to make an array's name from two variables' value. I try this the code below. But it's giving me an error: Undefined variable.

I want something like: $k = ${'B'.$a} where $a=5 and $B5 = array('c', 'v', 'b'); and want to echo($k[2]);

the codes that i want to solve is here...

$B0 = array('apple', 'crow', 'monkey', 'lion', 'deer', 'bear', 'tiger');
$B1 = array('bad', 'meaningless', 'odd', 'no fare', 'poor', 'old', 'dirty', 'damn', 'rush');
function($set, $number){
     while($set >= 2){
          $set -= 2;
     }
     if($set == 0){
          while($number >= 7){
               $numbur -= 7;
          }
     } else {
          while($number >= 9){
               $numbur -= 9;
          }
     }
     $array = ${'B'.$set}; // Error
     return $array[$number];
}
/*Error: it is saying that here the "${'B'.$set}" is a Undefined variable
where it is a name of an array. what can I do to realize
that it is not a variable but an array.*/
share|improve this question
    
I get NULL if I try that (with var_dump())... –  Niet the Dark Absol Mar 25 '12 at 19:16
    
What is it you're trying to do? ${$a.'_'.$b} = array(); ?? –  Michael Berkowski Mar 25 '12 at 19:17
    
thanks Michael for your editing... –  Black Cobra Mar 25 '12 at 19:17
    
Did you forget to paste the code that doesn't work? –  Juhana Mar 25 '12 at 19:19
3  
Sounds like you should go with multidimensional arrays instead. In most cases variable variables are a bad idea. –  Juhana Mar 25 '12 at 19:22

4 Answers 4

You want to use:

${$name}[$key]

In this case ${$a.'_'.$b}[$key]

This will assign the variable name to the array's name.

EDIT

As Juhana mentioned, it's really much safer to use a multidimensional array though. Rather than use $B0, why not use:

$B[0] = array('apple', 'crow', 'monkey', 'lion', 'deer', 'bear', 'tiger');
$B[1] = array('bad', 'meaningless', 'odd', 'no fare', 'poor', 'old', 'dirty', 'rush');

Then you can just reference it in your function like so:

global $B[$set];

return $B[$set][$number];

It's much cleaner. Just because the variable creation method works, doesn't mean that it is the best or safest method to use. In your case, it is not as much a safety concern because you are appending the variable name after B. But if you were not doing this, and you were just directly referencing a string to use as a variable name, you could run into problems.

share|improve this answer
$array['tea']['pot'] = 'Too Hot';
echo $array[$a][$b];
share|improve this answer

It's a BAD idea to use this as several other people mentioned. But if you feel strongly about it, it's simple:

$B5 = array('one', 'two', 'three');
$a = 5;
$k = 'B'.$a;

Using var_dump($$k); you'll get

array(3) { [0]=> string(3) "one" [1]=> string(3) "two" [2]=> string(5) "three" }

To access an array value via its index, use either:

echo ${$k}[0];

or via another variable:

$another_var = $$k;
echo $another_var[0];
share|improve this answer
    
The downvote is rather dumb - pay attention to the OP question. –  leon Mar 27 '12 at 16:30
up vote -2 down vote accepted

I got the real problem and its solve... Here the arrays "B0" and "B1" are places outside the function so you have to declare the ${'B'.$set} as a global array by just adding a single line inside the function before you call it. Like this:

$B0 = array('apple', 'crow', 'monkey', 'lion', 'deer', 'bear', 'tiger');
$B1 = array('bad', 'meaningless', 'odd', 'no fare', 'poor', 'old', 'dirty', 'damn', 'rush');
function($set, $number){
     while($set >= 2){
          $set -= 2;
     }
     if($set == 0){
          while($number >= 7){
               $numbur -= 7;
          }
     } else {
          while($number >= 9){
               $numbur -= 9;
          }
     }
     global ${'B'.$set};
     $array = ${'B'.$set};
     return $array[$number];
}

now it will understand and will get the array properly and will not show any errors.

share|improve this answer
    
it should be just $B array with 2 nested sub-arrays, silly. –  Your Common Sense Mar 26 '12 at 12:07

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