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I have a class of students which I store into set in my cpp file. The problem I am having is printing out the actual Student object. I have tried all that I can think of and all I get is either the address of the pointer or a compile error. I have a method in my student class called display that prints out all the information in the format I want it to be.

Here is what I have so far.

.cpp file

#include "Name.h"
#include "Student.h"
#include<iostream>
#include<string>
#include<set>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    Student s1;
    set<Student *> s;
    while(cin>>s1)
    {
        s.insert(new Student(s1));
    }
    for(set<Student *>::const_iterator it = s.begin(); it != s.end(); ++it)
    {
        &(*it).display(cout);
    }
}

Student.h

#ifndef STUDENT_H
#define STUDENT_H
#include<string>
#include<iostream>
#include<map>
#include "Name.h"
typedef std::map<std::string, int> GradeMap;

class Student {
public:
    Student(const std::string id="", const Name& name = Name(),const GradeMap & grades = GradeMap()):id_(id),name_(name),grades_(grades){}
    Student(const Student& s):id_(s.id_),name_(s.name_),grades_(s.grades_){}
    virtual ~Student(){}
    friend std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, Student& s);

    virtual void display(std::ostream& os) const{
        os << "ID: " << id_ <<std::endl<< "Name: " << name_ << std::endl;

        for(std::map<std::string, int>::const_iterator it = grades_.begin(); it != grades_.end(); ++it)
            os<<it->first<<' '<<it->second<<std::endl;
    }

private:
  std::string id_;
  Name name_;
  GradeMap grades_;

};

inline std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, Student& s)
{
    std::string id;
    std::string key;
    int grade;
    int count = 0;
    Name name;

    if(is>>id>>name>>count){
        s.id_ = id;
        s.name_ = name;
    }
    else {
        is.setstate(std::ios_base::failbit);
    }


    for(int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        if(is>>key>>grade)
        {
            s.grades_[key] = grade;
        }
    }
    return is;
}
#endif

Name.h

#ifndef NAME_H
#define NAME_H
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
class Name{
    public:
        explicit Name(const std::string& first = "",const std:: string& last = ""):first_(first),last_(last){}
        friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, const Name&);
        friend std::istream& operator>>(std::istream&, Name&);
private:
        std::string first_;
        std::string last_;
};

inline std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Name& n){
    return os << n.first_<< " " << n.last_;
}
inline std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, Name& n){
    std::string first,last;
    if(is >> first >> last ){
        n.first_ = first;
        n.last_ = last;
    }
    else
        is.setstate(std::ios_base::failbit);
    return is;
}
#endif

also here is the file I using to test this

111111111
john smith
3
comp2510 25
eng2525 60
bio3512 45
222222222
jane doe
2
elex1510 90
comp2510 85

The file is organized like so. The id of the student comes first, then their name, and then the number of courses they have taken follow by that many number of courses plus the grade they got in that course.

My question is how would you print out the actual student object?

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3  
Note that your code leaks memory. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 25 '12 at 19:56
    
Whenever you find yourself using pointers or new, you should get very, very worried and make triply sure that you understand why you're doing that and why you aren't doing it better. –  Kerrek SB Mar 25 '12 at 19:59
    
your right, i forgot I need to deallocate memory –  user798774 Mar 25 '12 at 20:07
    
Could you store Students instead of pointers to Students? Then you could use std::ostream_iterator<Student>(std::cout) to print them all. –  Peter Wood Mar 25 '12 at 21:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In the for loop:

for(set<Student *>::const_iterator it = s.begin(); it != s.end(); ++it)
{
    &(*it).display(cout);
}

(*it) is a Student*:

(*it)->display(cout);
share|improve this answer
    
thanks I did not think of that before –  user798774 Mar 25 '12 at 20:05

The iterator behaves like a pointer to the actual set element, so dereferencing the iterator gives you the set element. That element is itself a pointer to a Student object. So you need to dereference twice:

(**it).display(cout);

Which is better written as:

(*it)->display(cout);

Better yet, overload the << operator in a similar way to >>, and you can write:

cout << (**it);

(Parentheses for clarity only.)


Even better, don't bother with pointers at all, and declare s as a set<Student>. Sure, there will be a bit more copying, but you will stop leaking memory and get cleaner, simpler, safer, more maintainable code in return. (You will need a < overload to compare Students though.)

share|improve this answer
    
The << is even a two liner: std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& o, Student s) { s.display(o); return o; } –  Robert Mason Mar 25 '12 at 20:02
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

class Student
{
    std::string m_name;

public:
    Student(const std::string& name) :
    m_name(name)
    {
    }

    std::ostream& display(std::ostream& os) const
    {
        return os << m_name;
    }

    bool operator<(const Student& other) const
    {
        return m_name < other.m_name;
    }
};

Define operator<< for Student:

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Student& student)
{
    return student.display(os);
}

Using it:

#include <set>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

int main()
{
    std::set<Student> students;

    students.insert(Student("Alan"));
    students.insert(Student("Rudy"));

    std::copy(students.begin(), students.end(),
              std::ostream_iterator<Student>(std::cout, ", "));

    return 0;
}

Output:

Alan, Rudy, 
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