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My question assumes simple inserts into a table with no relevant relations.

// various unrelated operations w/context...
var one = new DbRecord();
var two = new DbRecord();
var thr = new DbRecord();
context.DbRecords.Add(one);
context.DbRecords.Add(two);
context.DbRecords.Add(thr);
// various unrelated operations w/context...
context.SaveChanges();

In this case, will my DbRecord entities always be inserted in the order I added them to the DbSet? They seem to be in my testing, but can I rely on this?

"various unrelated operations" refers to operations on different, not-related DbSets of the same context; inserts, deletes, and updated entities (POCOs, in my case)

I want them to be inserted in exact order so I can use the pk/identity field to sort by, yet I also need to take advantage of the implicit transaction that the context provides around my context.SaveChanges(). Although the other operations are not related as far as the database schema is concerned, the entries themselves are essentially log entries about the updates being performed, and their order is critical.

If the context does not guarantee inserting the records in the same order, I will have to add a datetime field to the records, and handle rolling back myself.

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Why? There's no such thing as 'order of insert' in the Database itself... Use an ORDER BY in the queries. –  Henk Holterman Mar 25 '12 at 19:57
    
@Henk I'll probably end up using a datetime field and sorting on that. Trying to see if I can sort by the identity/pk field, instead. –  Andrew Barber Mar 25 '12 at 20:02
    
@Henk: Of course a database has the concept of order of insertion. When you have an identity column, the value of that column is the essentially the order of insertion. You can then ORDER BY that column, and receive the records back in the order of insertion. –  Allon Guralnek Mar 25 '12 at 20:49
    
@AndrewBarber this link social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/… seems to suggest that they aren't inserted in the exact order –  Steve Ford Jan 6 at 15:50
1  
@AndrewBarber also see the answer from Alex James program manager for EF in 2009 where he states they don't preserve the order stackoverflow.com/questions/921442/… –  Steve Ford Jan 6 at 15:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is not guaranteed according to the documentation. This means, that you cannot rely on this behavior. Basically, it comes down to the questions whether you are willing to take the risk that...

  • ...your pager goes of in the middle of the night?
  • ...you find, after running for a year, that 10% of these records are corrupt without any possibility to fix them retroactively?

Answering these questions is up to you. Usually, the answer should be "no".

If your testing comes up ok, this does not mean that the "unrelated actions" your were talking about don't cause any disturbance in rare situations. This is a silent bug that nobody will notice during testing.

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1  
That was exactly my concern. I built the database initially planning on adding records to that table outside the Context, but it is going to end up being much easier to use the context to help me do it. So, it looks like a datetime field is in order! +1 –  Andrew Barber Mar 25 '12 at 20:39
    
Of course, you can also execute SaveChanges after every log record added (and wrap everything in a transaction so it is still atomic). Or you could insert immediately using ExecuteCommand. –  usr Mar 25 '12 at 21:17

I assume it is not inserted in the same order as added since I cannot seem to find any related information which confirms so. On the other hand, I believe this could help, at least I hope so. =)

How to observe the Add action of DbSet?

Though adding a DateTime field might be easier, this approach looks interesting for what you seem to want to accomplish. It suggests you subscribe to the Add action and set the order for yourself, so that you can make sure it shall get inserted as you want it to.

Hope this helps! =)

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That might be worth looking into, actually. Though a datetime field might be easier for my situation. +1 for the "don't assume, since it doesn't say so" and the idea! –  Andrew Barber Mar 25 '12 at 20:41

Isn't it possible in your case to use an explicit transatcion? I mean I would do something like:

using (TransactionScope transaction = new TransactionScope()){
  var one = new DbRecord();
  var two = new DbRecord();
  var thr = new DbRecord();
  context.DbRecords.Add(one);
  context.SaveChanges();
  context.DbRecords.Add(two);
  context.SaveChanges();
  context.DbRecords.Add(thr);
  context.SaveChanges();
  // various unrelated operations w/context...
  context.SaveChanges();
  transaction.Complete();
}
share|improve this answer
    
That would be possible to do, yes... but it would be much more complicating than simply adding a datetime field to the table. Thing is, I would need to include some of those various other operations in the specific transactions, which would mean a lot more complicated transaction code. –  Andrew Barber Mar 25 '12 at 22:10
    
I don't think you would need an extra datetime field with a similar solution. Actually the point of using an explicit transaction like this is that the order of the identities are guaranteed. I don't see why would you need complicated transaction code. I don't see any difference between (TransactionScope transaction = new TransactionScope()){ doSumeDbRelatedStuff1(); context.SaveChanges(); doSumeDbRelatedStuff2(); context.SaveChanges(); transaction.Complete(); } and the other version without an explicit transaction: doSumeDbRelatedStuff1(); doSumeDbRelatedStuff2(); context.SaveChanges(); –  Hari Mar 26 '12 at 6:16
    
I actually misunderstood your suggestion at first slightly. The transaction code would not actually be complicated, but the update code would be a little bit. I suppose I could just wrap the life of the Context in a transaction, and have the call to my Repository's Save() method commit it. –  Andrew Barber Mar 26 '12 at 12:01

If you only add rows, you can have the pk be incremental, in which case you CAN trust those to be in the right order. If you really want the time of the last edit, though you should use a datetime column as you said. But, altogether, sounds like you can do it all in a much more simpe and clean manner, if you want to elaborate on th real issue you are dealing with.

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You are right; I'll be going the route of adding a datetime field to assure proper sorting. Although I do have incremental pk values assigned, the problem is I don't believe I can rely on EF to insert the records in the same order I told it about them. –  Andrew Barber Mar 25 '12 at 20:45
    
Inceremental pk's will be assigned just right, promise. Edit: might depend on the db? What are you using for db? –  Yorye Nathan Mar 25 '12 at 20:49
    
I know incremental PK's will be assigned properly, based on the order the SQL INSERT statements come in, definitely. But what is not guaranteed is that Entity Framework will issue those INSERT statements in the order I called DbSet.Add(); –  Andrew Barber Mar 25 '12 at 20:51
    
It identifies pk as incremental and therefore the insertion order as crucial. It works. Edit: but again, its not like MS Access or something, right? –  Yorye Nathan Mar 25 '12 at 20:58
    
What is "it" you are referring to? EF? Do you have a link to such a claim? I've seen no such documentation that this is defined behavior, guaranteed to happen. Yes - in all my tests, they are inserted in order. But lacking documentation that promises this is how it's done, it would be silly to just assume. –  Andrew Barber Mar 26 '12 at 3:17

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