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I have a Handler class that looks like this:

class Handler{
    public $group;

    public function __construct(){
        $this->group = $this->database->mysql_fetch_data("blabla query");
        //if i print_r($this->group) here it gives proper result

        new ChildClass();
    }

    public function userGroup(){
        print_r($this->group); //this is empty
                    return $this->group;
    }
}

class ChildClass extends Handler{

    public function __construct(){
        $this->userGroup();
        //i tried this too
        parent::userGroup();
        //userGroup from parent always returns empty
    }

}

Workflow:

  • Handler is called from my index.php and the __construct is called

  • Handler needs to create $group

  • Handler creates child class

  • Child class calls Handler function

  • When I try to return $group in the function It tries to get $this->group from Child instead of Handler

Whenever I try to ask the parent something I can only access the parent function then inside the function the parent class can't find any of it's own variables

EDIT:

I figured using 'extends' would be useful in calling parent functions but it seems just passing $this on to the child will be easier.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You never called the parent constructor, so the group object is never initialized. You will want to do something like this.

class Handler{
    public $group;

    public function __construct(){
        $this->group = $this->database->mysql_fetch_data("blabla query");
        //if i print_r($this->group) here it gives proper result

        new ChildClass();
    }

    public function userGroup(){
        print_r($this->group); //this is empty
                    return $this->group;
    }
}

class ChildClass extends Handler{

    public function __construct(){
        parent::__construct();
        $this->userGroup();
    }

}

If you had not overwritten the __construct method in your extended class, then the parent __construct would have automatically been called, but since you overwrote it in the extended class, you must tell it to call the parent's __construct in your extended class' __construct.

share|improve this answer
    
Or maybe he wants public $group to be static and not actually have two different objects. :p – Basti Mar 25 '12 at 20:21
    
@Basti either way, he has to do the above, and since he didn't mention what you are talking about, I'm not sure why you bring it up. – dqhendricks Mar 25 '12 at 20:22
    
If i do this the parent calls on the child again and there is a endless loop – MakuraYami Mar 25 '12 at 20:23
    
@Basti If i make it static it says Notice: Undefined property: ChildClass::$group – MakuraYami Mar 25 '12 at 20:24
    
I'm bringing it up as an extension to your answer. No harm done. – Basti Mar 25 '12 at 20:26

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