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I've got following (simplified for example purpose) code and it works:

void log(const string type, const string msg, va_list argp)
{
    fprintf(stdout, "[%s] ", type.c_str());
    vfprintf(stdout, msg.c_str(), argp);
}

void log_err(const string msg, ...)
{
    va_list argp;

    va_start(argp, msg);
    log("ERROR", msg, argp);
    va_end(argp);
}

I would use it in this way:

log_err("test: %d", 5);

However if I would like to move this to class:

class Logger {
public:
    Logger() {
        //
    };
    void generic(const string type, const string msg, va_list argp) {
        fprintf(stdout, "[%s] ", type.c_str());
        vfprintf(stdout, msg.c_str(), argp);
    };
    void error(const string msg, ...) {
        va_list argp;

        va_start(argp, msg);
        this->generic("ERROR", msg, argp);
        va_end(argp);
    };
};

Then I got Segmentation fault. I know that tricky thing like va macros could not work within class scopes but I want to know why.

Thanks in advice!

EDIT

Example usage:

Logger logger;
logger.error("test", 5);

Full source:

#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdarg>

using namespace std;

void log(const string type, const string msg, va_list argp)
{
    fprintf(stdout, "[%s] ", type.c_str());
    vfprintf(stdout, msg.c_str(), argp);
}

void log_err(const string msg, ...)
{
    va_list argp;

    va_start(argp, msg);
    log("ERROR", msg, argp);
    va_end(argp);
}

class Logger {
    public:
        Logger() {
            //
        };
        void generic(const string type, const string msg, va_list argp) {
            fprintf(stdout, "[%s] ", type.c_str());
            vfprintf(stdout, msg.c_str(), argp);
        };
        void error(const string msg, ...) {
            va_list argp;

            va_start(argp, msg);
            this->generic("ERROR", msg, argp);
            va_end(argp);
        };
};

int main()
{
    //log_err("test: %s\n", "str");

    Logger logger;
    logger.error("test %s", 5);

    return 0;
}

I don't want to make these methods static because in original use i have private file descriptors to which I'm writing log messages;

share|improve this question
2  
got variadic templates yet? –  sehe Mar 25 '12 at 20:29
    
The code you pasted looks fine. Where does the segmentation fault occur? What does the call of error look like? (And get rid of the this->, it's not needed.) –  David Schwartz Mar 25 '12 at 20:35
    
How are you actually calling error()? The 'tricky' thing about classes and varargs is that you can't pass a non-POD object in the variable argument list. –  Michael Burr Mar 25 '12 at 20:36
    
You show definitions for functions log() and log_err(). Your log_err() function calls verror_log(), which is not shown. In C, you'd have to worry about your log() conflicting with log() from the mathematics portion of the standard C library; in C++, you don't have the same issues. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 25 '12 at 20:42
    
@DavidSchwartz: It's segfaulting when I'm running example I've posted in update to the question. –  Sebastian Sito Mar 25 '12 at 21:06
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The bug is in this line:

      logger.error("test %s", 5);

The %s format specifier is for a C-style string. 5 is not a C-style string. Use:

      logger.error("test %s", "5");

or:

      logger.error("test %d", 5);
share|improve this answer
    
Wow! It worked! I've slipped over such obvious thing, thanks David! –  Sebastian Sito Mar 25 '12 at 21:53
    
@SebastianSito: if you're using GCC you can mark the function as using a printf() style format string and have the compiler warn you about problems like this. Something like: __attribute__ ((format (printf, 2, 3))) would do the trick (I think). For details see gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Function-Attributes.html –  Michael Burr Mar 25 '12 at 23:00
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You're 99% of the way there. change

 void generic(const string type, const string msg, va_list argp)

to

void generic(const string type, const string msg, va_list & argp)

Seems you can't copy the list (which is done without the reference)

EDIT:: what I posted above is wrong. The first pass through I just assumed what was provided seg faulted and didn't test without the reference. I removed the reference and everything printed just fine.

Left for people of the future.

share|improve this answer
    
So You're telling me that above example works for You? Can You paste Your code along with complilation flags? –  Sebastian Sito Mar 25 '12 at 21:12
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