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How is it that in line below on the right side of equation one could use symbol 'fibs' although it is not yet definied:

let fibs = 0 : 1 : zipWith (+) fibs (tail fibs)
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@NiklasB. I know what is recursion but I do not understand this specific one liner. See my comment under GManNickG answer. –  Trismegistos Mar 25 '12 at 21:51
    
@NiklasB. Most languages make you jump through a couple of hoops to use a value in its own definition, though. Few have laziness built in. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 25 '12 at 21:52
    
@Daniel: Yes, true, most languages only support recursion for functions, not for lists. –  Niklas B. Mar 25 '12 at 22:13
    
s/lists/basically all values –  Louis Wasserman Mar 26 '12 at 0:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The point is that the definition of fibs

fibs = 0 : 1 : zipWith (+) fibs (tail fibs)

is not evaluated until it is used somewhere else. Then the definition unfolds using the already known part. We begin with fibs = 0 : 1 : ???. Then if the third element is ever needed, the definition is evaluated one step further,

fibs = 0 : 1 : zipWith (+) (0 : 1 : ???) (tail (0 : 1 : ???))
     = 0 : 1 : zipWith (+) (0 : 1 : ???) (1 : ???)
     = 0 : 1 : (0 + 1) : zipWith (+) (1 : ???) (???)

but then the unknown part ??? has become partly known, it has been determined to be ??? = 1 : ????, so the unfolding can go on,

     = 0 : 1 : 1 : zipWith (+) (1 : 1 : ????) (1 : ????)
     = 0 : 1 : 1 : 2 : zipWith (+) (1 : ????) (????)
     -- now ???? is known to be 2:?????
     = 0 : 1 : 1 : 2 : zipWith (+) (1 : 2 : ?????) (2 : ?????)

etc.

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Thanks, at first glance it looks more tricky than function recursion. Are there some constraints on the syntax that computes list/values recursively? In other words, but not precesily, what is allowed syntax? –  Trismegistos Mar 26 '12 at 19:02
1  
There are no syntactical restrictions, you just use the value being defined in the expression it's defined as, value = some expression using value. The point to watch out for is whether the computation terminates. You could for example try to define cycle xs = let result = result ++ xs in result. But if you try to evaluate it, you first have to find out whether result is nonempty, to know which equation to use for (++). So you look at the definition of result, result = result ++ xs, so to find out whether result is nonempty, you must find out whether result is nonempty ... –  Daniel Fischer Mar 26 '12 at 19:31
1  
But if you defined it cycle xs = let result = xs ++ result in result, you already know enough of result not to get stuck when the need of inspecting result arises in the computation of result (unless xs is empty, that would put you in the let x = x in x situation). So, such a self-referencing definition requires that some part of value can be determined before inspecting it in the defining expression, and the next needed part can always be determined using what is already known. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 26 '12 at 19:31

It won't actually try to call fibs in your definition until something else uses fibs later on in your program, at which point fibs has been completely defined.

You can do this in most other languages too:

int foo(int x)
{
    if (x <= 0) return 0;

    // will call foo when it gets there, at which point its been defined
    foo(x - 1); 
}
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I understand recurence in imperative languages and also in haskell when it is splitted to few lines. e.g fib 0 = 0; fib 1 = 1; fib n = fib (n - 1) + fib (n - 2). I do not understand way it is used in example I have given in main question. –  Trismegistos Mar 25 '12 at 21:49
1  
@Trismegistos: It's exactly the same, Haskell doesn't need to execute this function until it's called. When you call fibs somewhere else, and within that call it reaches fibs, it just stat the process over again. Haskell doesn't need to call it or anything while it's being defined/parsed. –  GManNickG Mar 25 '12 at 21:56

All Haskell bindings are recursive. This is different than most languages, but it often works correctly due to laziness (Haskell evaluation is non-strict, in contrast to most popular languages). Newbies are often tripped up when they try something like:

main = do
  let a = 3
  let a = 3 + a
  print a

Because the second binding to a actually ignores and shadows the first, and defines a in terms of itself, which causes an infinite loop when you try to print out the result of 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 + ...

A simpler example of an infinite list is ones: an infinite list of 1s

ones = 1 : ones

In this case, ones simply refers to itself

   _______
   |     |
   v     |
________ |
| ones | |
| 1 : ---|
--------

In Haskell, you can create an infinite tree in much the same way that you can create an infinite list:

data Tree a = Stub | Branch a (Tree a) (Tree a)
onesTree = Branch 1 onesTree onesTree


______  _______
|    |  |      |
|    v  v      |
| ____________ |
| | onesTree | |
|--- | 1 | ----|
  ------------

I think the real question is: why don't other languages support recursive values as conveniently as Haskell?

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Well, to understand this it's good to understand how lazy evaluation is implemented. Basically, unevaluated expressions are represented by thunks: a data structure that represents all of the information needed to calculate the value when it is actually needed. When the latter happens (or as we say, when the thunk is forced), the code to calculate the value is executed, and the thunk's content is replaced with the result—which may have pointers to other thunks.

So fibs starts out as a thunk. This thunk contains pointers to the code that's used to compute its value, and pointers to the thunks that this code takes as arguments. One of these latter pointers is a pointer to fibs itself.

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