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I am newbie to Winform C#. Now I am in a challenging requirement, but it may be silly for you guys.

Could any of you please help me with the code for my requirement below.

I have a textbox for decimal value (Amount) in Winform app. I have kept good validations etc. It allows only 2 digits after decimal point. Also if the user tabs from previous control to this textbox, the whoe value (Decimal number in the textbox say for example "22223.39" will be highlighted). All good.

But my business user wants like, if he tabs from previous control to this textbox, and supposing they want to change the digits after the decimal point alone in the above example i.e "39" they want to tab and just keyin so that it will only be overwrited with a new value and the value "22223" will stay still. They should be able to back front and back again.

i.e its like, in simple words, if the user tabs within a textbox, it should first go to the number field and highlight the number (In above example it should highlight "22223" and then if the user again presses tab, it should go and highlight the digits after decimal (In above example 39"). I am unsure how to do it. And, if the user again presses the tab for 3rd time, it should move to the next control/textbox(Asusual).

But I got idea of keeping 2 textboxes, which is silly. I want exact same functionality what I mentioned and only in textbox and its C# Winform app.

Also I dont need the numeric updown control which has got some limitations wrt our requirement.

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Windows User Experience Interaction Guidelines: microsoft.com/download/en/… -> if you do end up using the Tab key for two purposes, at least have a setting to make it go back to normal. –  Jeremy Thompson Mar 26 '12 at 0:16
    
Please don't prefix your titles with "C# Winform" and such. That's what tags are for. –  John Saunders Mar 26 '12 at 0:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Its not a good idea, it goes against standard operation of window applications.

Plus you'll have to turn off TabStop on your controls and do the Tabbing yourself. I would talk to the user with the above in mind and ask if pressing the "." would be good enough to highlight the decimal places. Here's some code to demonstrate my proposed solution:

private void textBox1_KeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.KeyValue == 190 && textBox1.Text.IndexOf(".") > 0)
    {
        textBox1.SelectionStart = textBox1.Text.IndexOf(".") + 1;
        textBox1.SelectionLength = 2;
        e.SuppressKeyPress = true;
    }
}

If you want multiple textboxes to share this functionality, go into the InitializeComponent() and do the following:

this.textBox1.KeyDown += new System.Windows.Forms.KeyEventHandler(this.textBox1_KeyDown);
this.textBox2.KeyDown += new System.Windows.Forms.KeyEventHandler(this.textBox1_KeyDown);
this.textBox3.KeyDown += new System.Windows.Forms.KeyEventHandler(this.textBox1_KeyDown);
share|improve this answer
    
Yours also prevents tabbing out of focus –  Yorye Nathan Mar 25 '12 at 23:55
    
No your mistaken. Put two textbox's on a form and press tab, see how the focus does navigate to the next textbox. –  Jeremy Thompson Mar 26 '12 at 0:12
    
The OP asked for a single text box with a decimal point, and tabbing to highlight, not change focus. –  Yorye Nathan Mar 26 '12 at 0:27
1  
Agreed. Anyways, I deleted my answer as it had a bug and I saw a great answer above, so why bother. –  Yorye Nathan Mar 26 '12 at 0:43
1  
Jeremy Thompson (You are like Jeremy Renner as in the movie "The Hurt Locker" or "Mission Impossible" brave and smart :)).... Very nice answers by you :) I really appreciate your skill blended with kindness :) Thank you and yes I am new in using this form also, will explore more too.... :) Cheers... –  Divine Mar 26 '12 at 3:32

As Jeremy Thompson rightly says, this is a bad idea so you should probably try and convince the user to use some other more standard input method.

That said, mainly as an exercise in seeing if I could make this work I came up with the following subclassed textbox control that behaves correctly in every trial I could think of off the top of my head. That includes things like correctly tabbing in and out of the textbox as well as highlighting the decimal part again when left arrowing backwards.

The main trick is the IsInputKey override - the rest of the code came from me testing things. If you do end up using something based on this please test it thoroughly since as with any warping of standard control functionality it is likely to have odd corner case gotchas.

public class TabTextBox : TextBox
{

    public bool ready_to_leave = false;

    protected override void OnEnter(EventArgs e)
    {
        this.SelectionStart = 0; // this.Text.IndexOf(".") + 1;
        this.SelectionLength = this.Text.IndexOf(".");
    }  

    protected override bool IsInputKey(Keys keyData)
    {
        if (keyData == Keys.Tab && !ready_to_leave)
        {
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            return base.IsInputKey(keyData);
        }
    }

    protected override void OnLeave(EventArgs e)
    {
        ready_to_leave = false;
        base.OnLeave(e);
    }

    protected override void OnKeyPress(KeyPressEventArgs e)
    {
        if (ready_to_leave)
        {
            e.Handled = true;
        }
        base.OnKeyPress(e);
    }

    protected override void OnKeyDown(KeyEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.KeyData == Keys.Tab && !ready_to_leave)
        {
            this.SelectionStart = this.Text.IndexOf(".") + 1;
            this.SelectionLength = 2;
            ready_to_leave = true;
            e.Handled = true;
        }
        else
        {

            base.OnKeyDown(e);
        }
    }

    protected override void OnKeyUp(KeyEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.KeyCode == Keys.Left)
        {
            if (this.SelectionStart - 1 < this.Text.IndexOf("."))
                ready_to_leave = false;
        }
        base.OnKeyUp(e);
    }
} 
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