Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my razor style helper class (located in the App_Code folder, I've got this line of code:

<img src="../../Content/images/ajax_activity.gif" alt="loading"/>

This works fine in Cassini, but when I deploy the app to IIS (virtual directory), IIS can't find the path. The virtual path is being ignored. This also doesn't work:

<img src="@Href("~/Content/images/ajax_activity.gif")" alt="loading" />
share|improve this question
    
This also doesn't work ... Why not? Please show us the generated HTML. –  SLaks Mar 25 '12 at 23:10
    
Hi SLaks. As this is an ajax call within a jQuery dialog box, there is no way (at least I don't know any) to see the generated source, but watching it in Firebug, I get the following error message: "NetworkError: 404 Not Found - localhost/Content/images/ajax_activity.gif";. I have set up the virtual directory to be Merkur, so the real path should be localhost/Merkur/Content/images/ajax_activity.gif. –  zszep Mar 26 '12 at 19:12
    
And another thing. Both samples above work fine when called from within a view. The problem seems to be related to having the helpers located in the App_Code directory (need them to be there because I call them from multiple views). –  zszep Mar 26 '12 at 19:17
1  
Look at the Net tab –  SLaks Mar 26 '12 at 19:28
    
Great, it's there and it is returning the following: <img src="../../Content/images/ajax_activity.gif" alt="loading" /> –  zszep Mar 26 '12 at 19:51

3 Answers 3

Try this:

<img src="@Url.Content("~/Content/images/ajax_activity.gif")" alt="loading" />
share|improve this answer
    
This results in the following compiler error: CS0103: The name 'Url' does not exist in the current context –  zszep Mar 25 '12 at 23:14
    
This worked for me. Probably more applicable to a broader range of environments. –  Jordan Jan 17 at 20:33
up vote 2 down vote accepted

OK, solved it, though I'm not really sure why it's working. After trying all the following combinations without success:

<img src="../Content/images/ajax_activity.gif" alt="loading"/>
<img src="/Content/images/ajax_activity.gif" alt="loading"/>
<img src="~/Content/images/ajax_activity.gif" alt="loading"/>
<img src="Content/images/ajax_activity.gif" alt="loading"/>

the following finally worked as expected

<img src="./Content/images/ajax_activity.gif" alt="loading"/>

It returned the image path correctly with the virtual directory set. Anyone able to explain this?

share|improve this answer
1  
Late reply, but ./Stuff/foo.bar will look in the base directory of the application for Stuff/foo.bar. ~/Stuff/foo.bar corresponds to a virtual path which you presumably did not configure. ../Stuff/foo.bar is a relative path that looks in the parent directory for Stuff/foo.bar. Stuff/foo.bar looks in the current directory, and /Stuff/foo.bar.. well, I can't explain that one. I would have expected that one to also look in the base directory. Stumbled across this while trying to fix similar solution. Point being these can all be different, which is why it might not work. –  Dan Pantry Aug 18 at 8:45
    
Wouldn't Stuff/foo.bar be the "Stuff subdirectory" in the current directory? –  zszep Aug 18 at 12:08
    
Yeah, sorry, I meant Stuff/foo.bar would look in the current directory for Stuff/foo.bar –  Dan Pantry Aug 18 at 14:13

When you deploy in a virtual directory in IIS, the app root may be different from what you had in your dev environment.

If your app url si something like

http://localhost/MyWebApp/

ASP.NET will consider the root is "localhost", when it should be "MyWebApp".

To solve this, you have to convert the virtual directory to an application : in IIS Manager, find your directory, right clic on it, and then "Convert to application".

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.