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When asking about common undefined behavior in C, souls more enlightened than I referred to the strict aliasing rule.
What are they talking about?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 235 down vote accepted

A typical situation you encounter strict aliasing problems is when overlaying a struct (like a device/network msg) onto a buffer of the word size of your system (like a pointer to uint32_ts or uint16_ts). When you overlay a struct onto such a buffer, or a buffer onto such a struct through pointer casting you can easily violate strict aliasing rules.

So in this kind of setup, if I want to send a message to something I'd have to have two incompatible pointers pointing to the same chunk of memory. I might then naively code something like this:

struct Msg
{
   unsigned int a;
   unsigned int b;
};

int main()
{
   // Get a 32-bit buffer from the system
   uint32_t* buff = malloc(sizeof(Msg));

   // Alias that buffer through message
   Msg* msg = (Msg*)(buff);

   // Send a bunch of messages    
   for (int i =0; i < 10; ++i)
   {
      msg->a = i;
      msg->b = i+1;
      SendWord(buff[0] );
      SendWord(buff[1] );   

   }

}

The strict aliasing rule makes this setup illegal, dereferencing a pointer that aliases another of an incompatible type is undefined behavior. Unfortunately you can still code this way, maybe* get some warnings, have it compile fine, only to have weird unexpected behavior when you run the code.

*(gcc appears pretty inconsistent in its ability to give aliasing warnings, giving us a friendly warning here but not here)

To see why this behavior is undefined, we have to think about what the strict aliasing rule buys the compiler. Basically, with this rule, it doesn't have to think about inserting instructions to refresh the contents of buff every run of the loop. Instead when optimizing, with some annoyingly unenforced assumptions about aliasing, it can omit those instructions, load buff[0] and buff[1] once before the loop is run, and speed up the body of the loop. Before strict aliasing was introduced, the compiler had to live in a state of paranoia that the contents of buff could change at anytime from anywhere by anybody. So to get an extra performance edge, and assuming most people don't type pun pointers, the strict aliasing rule was introduced.

Keep in mind, if you think the example is contrived, this might even happen if you're passing a buffer to another function doing the sending for you, if instead you have.

 void SendMessage(uint32_t* buff, size_t size32)
 {
    for (int i = 0; i < size32; ++i) 
    {
       SendWord(buff[i]);
    }
 }

And rewrote our earlier loop to take advantage of this convenient function

   for (int i =0; i < 10; ++i)
   {
      msg->a = i;
      msg->b = i+1;
      SendMessage(buff, 2);
   }

The compiler may or may not be able to or smart enough to try to inline SendMessage and it may or may not decide to load or not load buff again. If SendMessage is part of another API that's compiled separately, it probably has instructions to load buff's contents. Then again, maybe you're in C++ and this is some templated header only implementation that the compiler thinks it can inline. Or maybe its just something you wrote in your .c file for your own convenience. Anyway undefined behavior might still ensue. Even when we know some of whats happening under the hood, its still a violation of the rule so no well defined behavior is guaranteed. So just by wrapping in a function that takes our word delimited buffer doesn't necessarily help.

So how do I get around this?

  • Use a union. Most compilers support this without complaining about strict aliasing. This is allowed in C99 and explicitly allowed in C11.
    union {
        Msg msg;
        unsigned int asBuffer[sizeof(Msg)];
    };
  • You can disable strict aliasing in your compiler (f[no-]strict-aliasing in gcc))

  • You can use char* for aliasing instead of your system's word. The rules allow an exception for char*. Its always assumed that char* aliases other types. However this won't work the other way, there's no assumption that your struct aliases a buffer of chars.

Beginner beware

This is only one potential minefield when overlaying two types onto each other. You should also learn about endianess, word alignment, and how to deal with alignment issues through packing structs correctly.

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8  
I am coming after the battle it seems.. may unsigned char* be used far char* instead ? I tend to use unsigned char rather than char as the underlying type for byte because my bytes are not signed and I don't want the weirdness of signed behavior (notably wrt to overflow) –  Matthieu M. Nov 12 '10 at 12:48
11  
@Matthieu: Signedness makes no difference to alias rules, so using unsigned char * is okay. –  Thomas Eding Jun 1 '11 at 21:24
6  
Isn't it undefined behaviour to read from an union member different from the last one written to? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 6 '11 at 14:41
9  
Bollocks, this answer is completely backwards. The example it shows as illegal is actually legal, and the example it shows as legal is actually illegal. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 22 '11 at 3:08
3  
@nubok: see the answer by Ben Voigt. The relevant paragraph of the C standard explicitly says 'character type' and does not mention 'void' or 'void pointer' at all. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 21 '13 at 4:06

The best explanation I have found is by Mike Acton, Understanding Strict Aliasing. It's focused a little on PS3 development, but that's basically just GCC.

From the article:

"Strict aliasing is an assumption, made by the C (or C++) compiler, that dereferencing pointers to objects of different types will never refer to the same memory location (i.e. alias each other.)"

So basically if you have an int* pointing to some memory containing and int and a then you point a float* to that memory and use it as a float you break the rule. If your code does not respect this, then the compiler's optimizer will most likely break your code.

The exception to the rule is a char*, which is allowed to point to any type.

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This is the strict aliasing rule, found in section 3.10 of the C++03 standard (other answers provide good explanation, but none provided the rule itself):

If a program attempts to access the stored value of an object through an lvalue of other than one of the following types the behavior is undefined:

  • the dynamic type of the object,
  • a cv-qualified version of the dynamic type of the object,
  • a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to the dynamic type of the object,
  • a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to a cv-qualified version of the dynamic type of the object,
  • an aggregate or union type that includes one of the aforementioned types among its members (including, recursively, a member of a subaggregate or contained union),
  • a type that is a (possibly cv-qualified) base class type of the dynamic type of the object,
  • a char or unsigned char type.

New C++11 wording (changes emphasized):

If a program attempts to access the stored value of an object through a glvalue of other than one of the following types the behavior is undefined:

  • the dynamic type of the object,
  • a cv-qualified version of the dynamic type of the object,
  • a type similar (as defined in 4.4) to the dynamic type of the object,
  • a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to the dynamic type of the object,
  • a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to a cv-qualified version of the dynamic type of the object,
  • an aggregate or union type that includes one of the aforementioned types among its elements or non-static data members (including, recursively, an element or non-static data member of a subaggregate or contained union),
  • a type that is a (possibly cv-qualified) base class type of the dynamic type of the object,
  • a char or unsigned char type.

Two changes were small: glvalue instead of lvalue, and clarification of the aggregate/union case.

The third change makes a stronger guarantee (relaxes the strong aliasing rule): The new concept of similar types that are now safe to alias.


Also the C wording (C99; ISO/IEC 9899:1999 6.5/7; the exact same wording is used in ISO/IEC 9899:2011 §6.5 ¶7):

An object shall have its stored value accessed only by an lvalue expression that has one of the following types 73) or 88):

  • a type compatible with the effective type of the object,
  • a qualified version of a type compatible with the effective type of the object,
  • a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to the effective type of the object,
  • a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to a qualified version of the effective type of the object,
  • an aggregate or union type that includes one of the aforementioned types among its members (including, recursively, a member of a subaggregate or contained union), or
  • a character type.

73) or 88) The intent of this list is to specify those circumstances in which an object may or may not be aliased.

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1  
Ben, as people are often directed here, I have allowed myself to add the reference to the C standard too, for the sake of completeness. –  Kos Dec 8 '11 at 14:44
    
@Kos: That's cool, thanks! Can you also comment on whether strict aliasing was required by C89/90? (I seem to recall not, that it was introduced at the same time as the restrict keyword, but I'm not sure). –  Ben Voigt Dec 8 '11 at 15:28
    
Look at the C89 Rationale cs.technion.ac.il/users/yechiel/CS/C++draft/rationale.pdf section 3.3 which talks about it. –  Patrick Jan 5 '12 at 1:44

Strict aliasing doesn't refer only to pointers, it affects references as well, I wrote a paper about it for the boost developer wiki and it was so well received that I turned it into a page on my consulting web site. It explains completely what it is, why it confuses people so much and what to do about it. Strict Aliasing White Paper. In particular it explains why unions are risky behavior for C++, and why using memcpy is the only fix portable across both C and C++. Hope this is helpful.

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"Strict aliasing doesn't refer only to pointers, it affects references as well" Actually, it refers to lvalues. "using memcpy is the only fix portable" Hear! –  curiousguy Dec 11 '11 at 18:05

Type punning via pointer casts (as opposed to using a union) is a major example of breaking strict aliasing.

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See my answer here for the relevant quotes, especially the footnotes but type punning through unions has always been allowed in C although it was poorly worded at first. You my want to clarify your answer. –  Shafik Yaghmour Jul 6 at 18:18
    
@ShafikYaghmour Updated. :-) –  Chris Jester-Young Jul 6 at 18:32

As addendum to what Doug T. already wrote, here is a simple test case which probably triggers it with gcc :

check.c

#include <stdio.h>

void check(short *h,long *k)
{
    *h=5;
    *k=6;
    if (*h == 5)
        printf("strict aliasing problem\n");
}

int main(void)
{
    long      k[1];
    check((short *)k,k);
    return 0;
}

Compile with gcc -O2 -o check check.c . Usually (with most gcc versions I tried) this outputs "strict aliasing problem", because the compiler assumes that "h" cannot be the same address as "k" in the "check" function. Because of that the compiler optimizes the if (*h == 5) away and always calls the printf.

For those who are interested here is the x64 assembler code, produced by gcc 4.6.3, running on ubuntu 12.04.2 for x64:

movw    $5, (%rdi)
movq    $6, (%rsi)
movl    $.LC0, %edi
jmp puts

So the if condition is completely gone from the assembler code.

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if you add a second short * j to check() and use it ( *j = 7 ) then optimization disapear since ggc does not not if h and j are not actualy point to same value. yes optimisation is really smart. –  philippe lhardy Dec 30 '13 at 20:30

Strict aliasing is not allowing different pointer types to the same data.

This article should help you understand the issue in full detail.

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1  
You can alias between references and between a reference and a pointer as well. See my tutorial dbp-consulting.com/tutorials/StrictAliasing.html –  Patrick Aug 16 '11 at 8:47

You can always get around it by casting through void*, but don't do it unless you are sure you know what you want:

// Get a 32-bit buffer from the system
uint32_t* buff = malloc(sizeof(Msg));
void* vbuff = (void*) buff;
// Alias that buffer through message
Msg* msg = (Msg*)(vbuff);

I found myself on this page after getting the type-punning warning writing Python/C code when calling Py_INCREF on a PyTypeObject*. I had this code giving me a warning:

PyTypeObject t;
...
Py_INCREF(&t); // Gives a warning, although this is straight from the example at http://docs.python.org/2/extending/newtypes.html.

To be cautious, I wrote this function:

inline PyObject* cast_to_PyObject(PyTypeObject* p) { 
    return reinterpret_cast<PyObject*>(static_cast<void*>(p)); 
}

to keep the dubious casting all in one place, and then the problematic code became

PyTypeObject t;
...
Py_INCREF(cast_to_PyObject(&t)); // Gives a warning, although this is straight from the example.
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