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Encouraged by this, and the fact I have billions of string to parse, I tried to modify my code to accept StringTokenizer instead of String[]

The only thing left between me and getting that delicious x2 performance boost is the fact that when you're doing

"dog,,cat".split(",")
//output: ["dog","","cat"]

StringTokenizer("dog,,cat")
// nextToken() = "dog"
// nextToken() = "cat"

How can I achieve similar results with the StringTokenizer? Are there faster ways to do this?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Are you only actually tokenizing on commas? If so, I'd write my own tokenizer - it may well end up being even more efficient than the more general purpose StringTokenizer which can look for multiple tokens, and you can make it behave however you'd like. For such a simple use case, it can be a simple implementation.

If it would be useful, you could even implement Iterable<String> and get enhanced-for-loop support with strong typing instead of the Enumeration support provided by StringTokenizer. Let me know if you want any help coding such a beast up - it really shouldn't be too hard.

Additionally, I'd try running performance tests on your actual data before leaping too far from an existing solution. Do you have any idea how much of your execution time is actually spent in String.split? I know you have a lot of strings to parse, but if you're doing anything significant with them afterwards, I'd expect that to be much more significant than the splitting.

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1  
+1, I like that idea of implementing Iterable<String>! –  coobird Jun 12 '09 at 13:13
    
Thanks Jon, I handcrafted the parsing (using lots of indexof's) and now it's x4 faster! –  Dani Jun 12 '09 at 13:56

After tinkering with the StringTokenizer class, I could not find a way to satisfy the requirements to return ["dog", "", "cat"].

Furthermore, the StringTokenizer class is left only for compatibility reasons, and the use of String.split is encouaged. From the API Specification for the StringTokenizer:

StringTokenizer is a legacy class that is retained for compatibility reasons although its use is discouraged in new code. It is recommended that anyone seeking this functionality use the split method of String or the java.util.regex package instead.

Since the issue is the supposedly poor performance of the String.split method, we need to find an alternative.

Note: I am saying "supposedly poor performance" because it's hard to determine that every use case is going to result in the StringTokenizer being superior to the String.split method. Furthermore, in many cases, unless the tokenization of the strings are indeed the bottleneck of the application determined by proper profiling, I feel that it will end up being a premature optimization, if anything. I would be inclined to say write code that is meaningful and easy to understand before venturing on optimization.

Now, from the current requirements, probably rolling our own tokenizer wouldn't be too difficult.

Roll our own tokenzier!

The following is a simple tokenizer I wrote. I should note that there are no speed optimizations, nor is there error-checks to prevent going past the end of the string -- this is a quick-and-dirty implementation:

class MyTokenizer implements Iterable<String>, Iterator<String> {
  String delim = ",";
  String s;
  int curIndex = 0;
  int nextIndex = 0;
  boolean nextIsLastToken = false;

  public MyTokenizer(String s, String delim) {
    this.s = s;
    this.delim = delim;
  }

  public Iterator<String> iterator() {
    return this;
  }

  public boolean hasNext() {
    nextIndex = s.indexOf(delim, curIndex);

    if (nextIsLastToken)
      return false;

    if (nextIndex == -1)
      nextIsLastToken = true;

    return true;
  }

  public String next() {
    if (nextIndex == -1)
      nextIndex = s.length();

    String token = s.substring(curIndex, nextIndex);
    curIndex = nextIndex + 1;

    return token;
  }

  public void remove() {
    throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
  }
}

The MyTokenizer will take a String to tokenize and a String as a delimiter, and use the String.indexOf method to perform the search for delimiters. Tokens are produced by the String.substring method.

I would suspect there could be some performance improvements by working on the string at the char[] level rather than at the String level. But I'll leave that up as an exercise to the reader.

The class also implements Iterable and Iterator in order to take advantage of the for-each loop construct that was introduced in Java 5. StringTokenizer is an Enumerator, and does not support the for-each construct.

Is it any faster?

In order to find out if this is any faster, I wrote a program to compare speeds in the following four methods:

  1. Use of StringTokenizer.
  2. Use of the new MyTokenizer.
  3. Use of String.split.
  4. Use of precompiled regular expression by Pattern.compile.

In the four methods, the string "dog,,cat" was separated into tokens. Although the StringTokenizer is included in the comparison, it should be noted that it will not return the desired result of ["dog", "", "cat].

The tokenizing was repeated for a total of 1 million times to give take enough time to notice the difference in the methods.

The code used for the simple benchmark was the following:

long st = System.currentTimeMillis();
for (int i = 0; i < 1e6; i++) {
  StringTokenizer t = new StringTokenizer("dog,,cat", ",");
  while (t.hasMoreTokens()) {
    t.nextToken();
  }
}
System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - st);

st = System.currentTimeMillis();
for (int i = 0; i < 1e6; i++) {
  MyTokenizer mt = new MyTokenizer("dog,,cat", ",");
  for (String t : mt) {
  }
}
System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - st);

st = System.currentTimeMillis();
for (int i = 0; i < 1e6; i++) {
  String[] tokens = "dog,,cat".split(",");
  for (String t : tokens) {
  }
}
System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - st);

st = System.currentTimeMillis();
Pattern p = Pattern.compile(",");
for (int i = 0; i < 1e6; i++) {
  String[] tokens = p.split("dog,,cat");
  for (String t : tokens) {
  }
}
System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - st);

The Results

The tests were run using Java SE 6 (build 1.6.0_12-b04), and results were the following:

                   Run 1    Run 2    Run 3    Run 4    Run 5
                   -----    -----    -----    -----    -----
StringTokenizer      172      188      187      172      172
MyTokenizer          234      234      235      234      235
String.split        1172     1156     1171     1172     1156
Pattern.compile      906      891      891      907      906

So, as can be seen from the limited testing and only five runs, the StringTokenizer did in fact come out the fastest, but the MyTokenizer came in as a close 2nd. Then, String.split was the slowest, and the precompiled regular expression was slightly faster than the split method.

As with any little benchmark, it probably isn't very representative of real-life conditions, so the results should be taken with a grain (or a mound) of salt.

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I think that this method should be as follows: public String next() { if (nextIndex == -1) nextIndex = s.length(); String token = s.substring(curIndex, nextIndex); curIndex = nextIndex + delim.length(); return token; } –  Juan Carlos Blanco Martínez Jul 21 '09 at 12:07

Note: Having done some quick benchmarks, Scanner turns out to be about four times slower than String.split. Hence, do not use Scanner.

(I'm leaving the post up to record the fact that Scanner is a bad idea in this case. (Read as: do not downvote me for suggesting Scanner, please...))

Assuming you are using Java 1.5 or higher, try Scanner, which implements Iterator<String>, as it happens:

Scanner sc = new Scanner("dog,,cat");
sc.useDelimiter(",");
while (sc.hasNext()) {
	System.out.println(sc.next());
}

gives:

dog

cat
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2  
I believe Scanner uses a regex internally though, so the OP may not get the performance boost they're looking for. Worth a try though, with a suitable benchmark :) –  Jon Skeet Jun 12 '09 at 13:31
2  
A quick performance poll gives me 47 ms for StringTokenizer, 625 ms for String.split and 2235 ms for Scanner. Hence, I retract my suggestion. Do not use Scanner, it is hideously slow. –  Zarkonnen Jun 12 '09 at 13:46

Depending on what kind of strings you need to tokenize, you can write your own splitter based on String.indexOf() for example. You could also create a multi-core solution to improve performance even further, as the tokenization of strings is independent from each other. Work on batches of -lets say- 100 strings per core. Do the String.split() or watever else.

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Rather than StringTokenizer, you could try the StrTokenizer class from Apache Commons Lang, which I quote:

This class can split a String into many smaller strings. It aims to do a similar job to StringTokenizer, however it offers much more control and flexibility including implementing the ListIterator interface.

Empty tokens may be removed or returned as null.

This sounds like what you need, I think?

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You could do something like that. It's not perfect, but it might be working for you.

public static List<String> find(String test, char c) {
	List<String> list = new Vector<String>();
	start;
	int i=0;
	while (i<=test.length()) {
		int start = i;
		while (i<test.length() && test.charAt(i)!=c) {
			i++;
		}
		list.add(test.substring(start, i));
		i++;
	}
	return list;
}

If possible you can ommit the List thing and directly do something to the substring:

public static void split(String test, char c) {
	int i=0;
	while (i<=test.length()) {
		int start = i;
		while (i<test.length() && test.charAt(i)!=c) {
			i++;
		}
		String s = test.substring(start,i);
		 // do something with the string here
		i++;
	}
}

On my System the last method is faster than the StringTokenizer-solution, but you might want to test how it works for you. (Of course you could make this method a little shorter by ommiting the {} of the second while look and of course you could use a for-loop instead of the outer while-loop and including the last i++ into that, but I didn't do that here because I consider that bad style.

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Well, the fastest thing you could do would be to manually traverse the string, e.g.

List<String> split(String s) {
    	List<String> out= new ArrayList<String>();
           int idx = 0;
           int next = 0;
    	while ( (next = s.indexOf( ',', idx )) > -1 ) {
    		out.add( s.substring( idx, next ) );
    		idx = next + 1;
    	}
    	if ( idx < s.length() ) {
    		out.add( s.substring( idx ) );
    	}
               return out;
    }

This (informal test) looks to be something like twice as fast as split. However, it's a bit dangerous to iterate this way, for example it will break on escaped commas, and if you end up needing to deal with that at some point (because your list of a billion strings has 3 escaped commas) by the time you've allowed for it you'll probably end up losing some of the speed benefit.

Ultimately it's probably not worth the bother.

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I would recommend Google's Guava Splitter.
I compared it with coobird test and got following results:

StringTokenizer 104
Google Guava Splitter 142
String.split 446
regexp 299

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If your input is structured, you can have a look at the JavaCC compiler. It generates a java class reading your input. It would look like this:

TOKEN { <CAT: "cat"> , <DOG:"gog"> }

input: (cat() | dog())*


cat: <CAT>
   {
   animals.add(new Animal("Cat"));
   }

dog: <DOG>
   {
   animals.add(new Animal("Dog"));
   }
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