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I have a binary search function that will search for a word in an array, but before I can search the array I need to know what word to search for. I have written the code to ask the user for input, but the program prints out the request for input but doesn't accept anything from the user. I was thinking it was a buffer issue, as I have an initial scanf in the program that loads all the character strings from an external file and places them in an array. I have tried using fflush after my initial scanf, and I tried rewriting the second one with gets, as pointed out in previous threads. Perhaps I am not implementing it correctly. Here's what I have so far, any tips as to why the second scanf isn't working is appreciated.

#include "set.h"
#include "sortAndSearch.h"
#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(){
char names[320][30];
char str[30];  
int i, j;
char *key;
int numOfWords;
char userWord[30];
Set set1, set2, set3;

//scan each char string into array names
for(i=0; scanf("%s", str) != EOF; i++){
        strcpy(names[i], str);
}

//set number of words in file
numOfWords = i;

//sort names array
//bubbleSort(names, numOfWords);

//print out names, sorted
//for(i=0; i<numOfWords; i++){
//      printf("%s\n", names[i]);
//}

printf("What word would you like to search for? ");
scanf("%s", userWord);

//addName2Set(set1, userWord);

return 0;
}
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If you want to read a line of input, use a function that reads a line. Otherwise, you are reading the word and leaving the line ending. –  David Schwartz Mar 26 '12 at 1:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your initial scanf() in a loop read everything up to EOF, so there's nothing left for the 'What word would you like to search for?' scanf() to read.

One way around this problem is to read the initial names from a file (fopen(), fscanf(), fclose() — and the file name might be an argument to the program, or a fixed name).

Another way you could try is clearerr(stdin); before the 'What word' scanf(). That (clearerr()) unsets the EOF bit and allows scanf() to try again. It may work if the input of the program is the terminal; it won't help if the input of the program is coming from a file.


int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    char names[320][30];
    char str[30];  
    int i, j;
    char *key;
    int numOfWords;
    char userWord[30];
    Set set1, set2, set3;
    FILE *fp;

    if (argc != 2)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s word-file\n", argv[0]);
        exit(1);
    }

    if ((fp = fopen(argv[1], "r")) == 0)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s word-file\n", argv[0]);
        exit(1);
    }

    //scan each char string into array names
    for (i = 0; i < 320 && fscanf(fp, "%29s", str) != EOF; i++)
    {
        strcpy(names[i], str);
    }

    fclose(fp);

    //set number of words in file
    numOfWords = i;

This insists that you use ./a.out example.dat (instead of ./a.out < example.dat). It will then work more or less as you want it to. Of course, the code for reading the file should be in a function that is passed the file name, the array, and the array size. The 320 in the loop is overflow protection and should be an enumeration enum { MAX_WORDS = 320 }; that's used both in the array declaration and the loop. The 29 is overflow protection; it is hard to parameterize that, but it is one less than the second dimension of the array.

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why wouldn't that scanf terminate at the end of the data.dat file? –  manalishi Mar 26 '12 at 2:02
    
the file name is not fixed, it is supplied when the program is run, ./a.out < example.dat –  manalishi Mar 26 '12 at 2:05
    
clearerr(stdin); didn't do the trick either. The initial input comes from an external file, second input comes from within terminal. –  manalishi Mar 26 '12 at 2:10
1  
If you're redirecting input from a file like that, then neither clearerr() nor anything else is going to help. Which platform are you on? On Unix, you could consider opening and reading /dev/tty, or even (daft as it sounds) reading from stdout or stderr. But while stdin is redirected from a file, the 'What word' scanf() is doomed to failure; you've read the whole file and there's nothing let for it to read. (You could rewind stdin and choose a word at random, but that would not allow you to search for words not in the list.) I recommend providing the word list as an argument. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 26 '12 at 2:22
    
Note that when your first loop executes, it is reading from the file you redirected; the program does not read from the terminal when you invoke it as ./a.out < example.dat. The 'What word' scanf() is also reading from the same place. stdin does not get magically switched simply because the input was all read into the program. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 26 '12 at 2:29

Your second scanf doesn't work because your first scanf never terminates. scanf won't return EOF unless the input stream is closed - that would be that the console closes.

Since scanf returns the number of characters read you should instead make your loop condition scanf(%s, str) != 0. That will make the loop end as soon as the user hits enter without entering anything.

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I changed for(i=0; scanf("%s", str) != 0; i++) but now I get a segmentation fault –  manalishi Mar 26 '12 at 2:02
    
the EOF is there because it is taking input from an external file and I don't know how much data is in that file. User is not prompted until second scanf. –  manalishi Mar 26 '12 at 2:12
    
What do you mean by 'the first scanf() never executes'? If the input is redirected from a file (there's a comment to the effect that's what happens), then the loop will execute scanf() repeatedly until the end of file. If the input is from a terminal, typing control-Z on Windows or control-D (typically) on Unix will terminate the input. In all cases, scanf() in the loop executes happily. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 26 '12 at 2:27
    
@JonathanLeffler - meant never terminates not never excecutes –  shf301 Mar 26 '12 at 2:33
    
@manalishi - if you're redirect a file to stdin then once the file is read stdin is at the EOF of the file. It doesn't get redirected back to the console. Use fopepn, fscanf, and fclose to read the file. –  shf301 Mar 26 '12 at 2:35

Your question and code seemed awfully misaligned at first glance...

scanf() is the wrong function for reading from your file, you want fscanf(), or if the file is formatted such that each word is on its own line fgets() works too (newline stops reading of each string). Likewise, you can use gets() instead of scanf() to read user input if the input is just a string followed by return(newline).

Everything you need to know about stdio.h

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