Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have these data transfer objects objects:

public class Report 
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int ProjectId { get; set; }
    //and so on for many, many properties.
}

I don't want to write

public bool areEqual(Report a, Report b)
{
    if (a.Id != b.Id) return false;
    if (a.ProjectId != b.ProjectId) return false;
    //Repeat ad nauseum
    return true;
}

Is there a faster way to test if to object with only properties have the same values (something that doesn't require one line of code or one logical expression per property?)

Switching to structs is not an option.

share|improve this question
    
I was thinking about this. In my mind the best way to do this would be via an IDE tool. It looks like Eclipse has one- eclipsezone.com/eclipse/forums/t92613.rhtml. I Wonder if there is something along those lines for VS.NET? –  RichardOD Jun 12 '09 at 14:03
    
@RichardOD: ReSharper can do this in VS.NET for instance. –  Lucero Dec 2 '09 at 10:16
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 42 down vote accepted

How about some reflection, perhaps using Expression.Compile() for performance? (note the static ctor here ensures we only compile it once per T):

using System;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

public class Report {
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int ProjectId { get; set; }
    static void Main() {
        Report a = new Report { Id = 1, ProjectId = 13 },
            b = new Report { Id = 1, ProjectId = 13 },
            c = new Report { Id = 1, ProjectId = 12 };
        Console.WriteLine(PropertyCompare.Equal(a, b));
        Console.WriteLine(PropertyCompare.Equal(a, c));
    }
}
static class PropertyCompare {
    public static bool Equal<T>(T x, T y) {
        return Cache<T>.Compare(x, y);
    }
    static class Cache<T> {
        internal static readonly Func<T, T, bool> Compare;
        static Cache() {
            var props = typeof(T).GetProperties();
            if (props.Length == 0) {
                Compare = delegate { return true; };
                return;
            }
            var x = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "x");
            var y = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "y");

            Expression body = null;
            for (int i = 0; i < props.Length; i++) {
                var propEqual = Expression.Equal(
                    Expression.Property(x, props[i]),
                    Expression.Property(y, props[i]));
                if (body == null) {
                    body = propEqual;
                } else {
                    body = Expression.AndAlso(body, propEqual);
                }
            }
            Compare = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, T, bool>>(body, x, y)
                          .Compile();
        }
    }
}

Edit: updated to handle fields too:

static class MemberCompare
{
    public static bool Equal<T>(T x, T y)
    {
        return Cache<T>.Compare(x, y);
    }
    static class Cache<T>
    {
        internal static readonly Func<T, T, bool> Compare;
        static Cache()
        {
            var members = typeof(T).GetProperties(
                BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public)
                .Cast<MemberInfo>().Concat(typeof(T).GetFields(
                BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public)
                .Cast<MemberInfo>());
            var x = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "x");
            var y = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "y");

            Expression body = null;
            foreach(var member in members)
            {
                Expression memberEqual;
                switch (member.MemberType)
                {
                    case MemberTypes.Field:
                        memberEqual = Expression.Equal(
                            Expression.Field(x, (FieldInfo)member),
                            Expression.Field(y, (FieldInfo)member));
                        break;
                    case MemberTypes.Property:
                        memberEqual = Expression.Equal(
                            Expression.Property(x, (PropertyInfo)member),
                            Expression.Property(y, (PropertyInfo)member));
                        break;
                    default:
                        throw new NotSupportedException(
                            member.MemberType.ToString());
                }
                if (body == null)
                {
                    body = memberEqual;
                }
                else
                {
                    body = Expression.AndAlso(body, memberEqual);
                }
            }
            if (body == null)
            {
                Compare = delegate { return true; };
            }
            else
            {
                Compare = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, T, bool>>(body, x, y)
                              .Compile();
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Genius! Works like a charm. –  MatthewMartin Jun 12 '09 at 18:10
2  
Wow, that's really sweet. Much nicer that the pure reflection version. –  Jonathan Allen Jun 12 '09 at 18:17
    
Why you not initialize body with Expression.Constant(true) to avoid if in cycle? –  ASpirin Dec 9 '10 at 20:11
    
@ASpirin - the if is only when creating the Expression, which is something you do once and then cache/re-use. I'd rather do that than add something else to the expression.... –  Marc Gravell Dec 9 '10 at 21:31
    
+1. Code generation through expressions is immensely powerful but underused in my opinion. –  JulianR Nov 21 '12 at 10:17
show 2 more comments

Originally answered at (question 1831747)

Check out my MemberwiseEqualityComparer to see if it fits your needs.

It's really easy to use and quite efficient too. It uses IL-emit to generate the entire Equals and GetHashCode function on the first run (once for each type used). It will compare each field (private or public) of the given object using the default equality comparer for that type (EqualityComparer.Default). We've been using it in production for a while and it seems stable but I'll leave no guarantees =)

It takes care of all those pescy edge-cases that you rarely think of when you're rolling your own equals method (ie, you can't comparer your own object with null unless you've boxed it in an object first and lot's off more null-related issues).

I've been meaning to write a blog post about it but haven't gotten around to it yet. The code is a bit undocumented but if you like it I could clean it up a bit.

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return MemberwiseEqualityComparer<Foo>.Default.GetHashCode(this);
}

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    if (obj == null)
        return false;

    return Equals(obj as Foo);
}

public override bool Equals(Foo other)
{
    return MemberwiseEqualityComparer<Foo>.Default.Equals(this, other);
}

The MemberwiseEqualityComparer is released under the MIT license meaining you can do pretty much whatever you want with it, including using it in proprietary solutions without changing you licensing a bit.

share|improve this answer
    
One possible enhancement would be to have the equality-test generator allow the use of field attributes to indicate which fields encapsulate identity and which ones encapsulate value. A fairly common pattern is to encapsulate a mutable-class value by holding a reference that will never be exposed to anything that might mutate it. Such a field should be tested for value equality even though calling Equals on its type would test for reference equality. –  supercat May 14 '13 at 19:14
add comment

Unfortunately you are going to have to write the method to compare the field values. System.ValueType is built to use reflection and compare the field values of a struct but even this is unadvisable due to slow performance. The best thing to do is to override the Equals method and also implement the IEquatable<T> interface for a strongly typed Equals overload.

While you are at it, you might as well provide a good GetHashCode override as well to complement the Equals implementation. All of these steps are considered good practice.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can do that easily with reflection. See an example here.

share|improve this answer
    
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Haatschii 12 hours ago
add comment

You will need to use reflection to do this, please follow this link --> http://stackoverflow.com/questions/506096/comparing-object-properties-in-c

share|improve this answer
add comment

Matthew,

Here is a tool that I wrote to compare any .NET object using reflection:

http://comparenetobjects.codeplex.com/

share|improve this answer
    
That is cool. The part about comparing datasets--I can use to do integration tests using nunit. –  MatthewMartin Aug 17 '11 at 19:41
    
Exactly. We used this class internally when developing Ninja Database Pro. kellermansoftware.com/p-43-ninja-database-pro.aspx –  Greg ''Wildman'' Finzer Aug 22 '11 at 19:01
add comment

I've extended Marc's code to be a fully-fledged IEqualityComparer implementation for my own uses, and thought this may be useful to others in the future:

/// <summary>
/// An <see cref="IEqualityComparer{T}"/> that compares the values of each public property.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T"> The type to compare. </typeparam>
public class PropertyEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
{
    // http://stackoverflow.com/questions/986572/hows-to-quick-check-if-data-transfer-two-objects-have-equal-properties-in-c/986617#986617

    static class EqualityCache
    {
        internal static readonly Func<T, T, bool> Compare;
        static EqualityCache()
        {
            var props = typeof(T).GetProperties();
            if (props.Length == 0)
            {
                Compare = delegate { return true; };
                return;
            }
            var x = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "x");
            var y = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "y");

            Expression body = null;
            for (int i = 0; i < props.Length; i++)
            {
                var propEqual = Expression.Equal(
                    Expression.Property(x, props[i]),
                    Expression.Property(y, props[i]));
                if (body == null)
                {
                    body = propEqual;
                }
                else
                {
                    body = Expression.AndAlso(body, propEqual);
                }
            }
            Compare = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, T, bool>>(body, x, y).Compile();
        }
    }

    /// <inheritdoc/>
    public bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        return EqualityCache.Compare(x, y);
    }

    static class HashCodeCache
    {
        internal static readonly Func<T, int> Hasher;
        static HashCodeCache()
        {
            var props = typeof(T).GetProperties();
            if (props.Length == 0)
            {
                Hasher = delegate { return 0; };
                return;
            }
            var x = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "x");

            Expression body = null;
            for (int i = 0; i < props.Length; i++)
            {
                var prop = Expression.Property(x, props[i]);
                var type = props[i].PropertyType;
                var isNull = type.IsValueType ? (Expression)Expression.Constant(false, typeof(bool)) : Expression.Equal(prop, Expression.Constant(null, type));
                var hashCodeFunc = type.GetMethod("GetHashCode", BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public);
                var getHashCode = Expression.Call(prop, hashCodeFunc);
                var hashCode = Expression.Condition(isNull, Expression.Constant(0, typeof(int)), getHashCode);

                if (body == null)
                {
                    body = hashCode;
                }
                else
                {
                    body = Expression.ExclusiveOr(Expression.Multiply(body, Expression.Constant(typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName.GetHashCode(), typeof(int))), hashCode);
                }
            }
            Hasher = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, int>>(body, x).Compile();
        }
    }

    /// <inheritdoc/>
    public int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {
        return HashCodeCache.Hasher(obj);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.