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My application does fast rendering (typically 1-6 ms per frame), with double buffering and sync to vblank enabled. In my mainloop, I want to sleep about 10 milliseconds, then read some real-time input and do the rendering as late as possible while still managing to update the frame before the deadline (for solid 60 FPS rendering with minimal latency).

I can use glFinish after swapping the buffers but unfortunately on some systems (Linux non-composited, at least) this appears to wait not only until the next buffer swap but until the image has been sent out the HDMI port (total wait in the range of 25 ms and application running at 30 FPS). On other systems (Linux composited) this approach works fine. Without glFinish more work is buffered, causing longer latency, so that is not good either.

What options do I have for more precise frame timing? The main platforms are Windows, Linux and OS X.

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Timing a frame with vertical synchronization enabled is meaningless. –  Thomas Mar 26 '12 at 2:06
    
It can work with sync enabled but I'd be happy to do it without, too - if only there was a reliable way (with no tearing, of course). –  Tronic Mar 26 '12 at 2:55
    
On OS X, you can use CGDisplayModeGetRefreshRate. –  user1118321 Mar 26 '12 at 5:17

1 Answer 1

I want to sleep about 10 milliseconds, then read some real-time input and do the rendering as late as possible while still managing to update the frame before the deadline (for solid 60 FPS rendering with minimal latency).

This is a very unreliable approach. I suggest you put all rendering operations into their own thread, which will block on the buffer swap until the swap happens. Do all input processing in a separate thread where all input data is accululated. Before doing the swap you should lift a mutex or semaphore on a processing thread, that does it's thing during the time of the buffer swap.

Keep in mind, that you should not delay rendering util very close of the V-Sync, because this might cause you to miss it. Instead you should assume some 75% at the beginning of the vertical retrace interval the time you got for rendering your stuff, while the rest 25% should be kept as a emergency margin. Also if you're running a compositor, this one needs a bit of the GPUs time as well.

There's no difference in the visual outcome if you render early or late. If you're concerned about your simulation timing: Just assume you'll actually make the deadline and render the simulation for the state it will have at V-Sync's time. Use a Kalman filter on any data input for the simulation so that render based on predictions and "merely" adjust for the new input.

I can use glFinish after swapping the buffers but unfortunately on some systems (Linux non-composited, at least) this appears to wait not only until the next buffer swap but until the image has been sent out the HDMI port (total wait in the range of 25 ms and application running at 30 FPS).

This happens if your timing misses the V-Sync: SwapBuffers will then wait a full vertical retrace period. IMHO SwapBuffers should be added some kind of timeout parameter, but so far it hasn't.

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Very good answer. One thing to add: glFinish is really meaningless. The right way to approach this is really as datenwolf said: Render as fast as possible, consider the GPU and the output a black box. Do not try to use it as a clock. Rendering might be delayed by many buffers that are out of your control. see: superuser.com/questions/419070/… Getting an accurate clock is hard enough. Using the graphics display for it is masochistic :) –  starmole May 22 '12 at 9:22

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