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The problem is this: say you have a 3d array, Z (so int[][][] Z = new int[n][n][n]). What you are trying to do is print out a new 3d array, that is a multiplication of Z, X times.

Say you have

z[3][3][3] = {
                   {{3,3,3}{3,3,3}}
                   {{3,3,3}{3,3,3}}
                   {{3,3,3}{3,3,3}}
                  }

and x = 3 (user input)

The goal is to print out this:

Z[0]
Z[1]
XXXXXXX
Z[0]*Z[0]
Z[1]*Z[1]
XXXXXXX
Z[0]*Z[0]*Z[0]
Z[1]*Z[1]*Z[1]

Since this is a square (actually cube...) matrix, each printed out matrix will be the same dimensions. What I have so far is this:

   public static void main(String[] args) {
    Scanner getIt = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.println("Input 1 integer n: ");
    int n = getIt.nextInt();
    if (n > 0){
        final double M[][][] = new double[n][n][n];
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            for (int j = 0; j < n; j++)
                for (int k = 0; k < n; k++)
                    M[i][j][k] = 3.0;
        System.out.println("Input 1 integer p: ");
        int p = getIt.nextInt();
        if(p > 0){
          for(int q = 1; q <= p; q++){
              for (int i = 0; i < n; i++){
                  for (int j = 0; j < n; j++){
                      for (int k = 0; k < n; k++){
                          System.out.printf("%f ", Math.pow(matrixMult(M[i], M[i])[j][k], q));
                      }
                      System.out.println("\n");
                  }

              }
              System.out.println("xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx");
          }
        }
        else{
            System.out.println("Woops, you entered a negative p.");
        }
    }
    else{
        System.out.println("Woops, you entered a negative n.");
    }
}

public static double[][] matrixMult(double a[][], double b[][]) {   
    int aRows = a.length; 
    int aCols = a[0].length; 
    int bCols = b[0].length;
    double[][] result = new double[aRows][bCols];   
    for(int i = 0; i < aRows; i++){ 
        for(int j = 0; j < bCols; j++){ 
            for(int k = 0; k < aCols; k++){ 
                result[i][j] += a[i][k] * b[k][j];      
                }
            }  
        }   
    return result;
}
share|improve this question
    
I'm reading that z will always be a cube matrix, but in your example z is 2 x 2 x 3. What gives? –  Adam Mihalcin Mar 26 '12 at 2:04
    
I don't think you want everything in one, big loop, do you? I suspect you really want three parts: 1) get the input, 2) multiply, 3) print the results. Don't you? –  paulsm4 Mar 26 '12 at 2:06
    
@AdamMihalcin yep, my bad! fixed –  user182078 Mar 26 '12 at 2:07
    
And why the "cube"? Wouldn't it be cleaner and easier just to have three 2-D arrays (A[] * B[] = Z[])? –  paulsm4 Mar 26 '12 at 2:08
    
@paulsm4 good thought...i originally tried that but found it was much more code, maybe i'll try that again now. –  user182078 Mar 26 '12 at 2:10

1 Answer 1

Paulsm4's advice is dead-on -- you don't want to do the entire thing in just two functions. You should have the input array, user input, multiplication, and output, each in their own functions. You may find other opportunities to split apart your program as you're working on it -- I strongly recommend breaking your program down into functions as much as possible, especially because you can debug small pieces far more effectively than you can large pieces. (What's wrong with your current program? Input? Output? Calculation? Data storage sizes, as Adam noticed? It's difficult to tell, because you don't know which functions work perfectly and which are still buggy.)

I'd like to suggest a further change: don't put the else clauses of your tests so far away, if you can help it. Consider changing this:

int n = getIt.nextInt();
if (n > 0){
/* loop */
    System.out.println("Input 1 integer p: ");
    int p = getIt.nextInt();
    if(p > 0){
    /* loop loop loop */
    }
    else{
        System.out.println("Woops, you entered a negative p.");
    }
}
else{
    System.out.println("Woops, you entered a negative n.");
}

to this:

int n = getIt.nextInt();
if (n <= 0) {
    System.out.println("Woops, you entered a negative n.");
/* exit or recover */
}

System.out.println("Input 1 integer p: ");
int p = getIt.nextInt();
if (p <= 0) {
    System.out.println("Woops, you entered a negative p.");
/* exit or recover */
}

/* loop */

/* loop loop loop */

Writing the code this way will make maintenance far easier and will probably also make it easier to spot units that can be removed into their own routines. (Consider a function that takes a String prompt and Scanner in parameters and returns a number greater than zero -- it can prompt and re-prompt as necessary and the result will be exactly what your main code needs -- keeping it as clean as possible. This function is more obviously useful when the code is re-written in this fashion.)

As for the bug that brought you here, I think this is probably the culprit:

System.out.printf("%f ", Math.pow(matrixMult(M[i], M[i])[j][k], q));

You're calculating a lot here but not storing the results at all. Won't you need those results for further calculation?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, very true especially on the last bit. I didn't notice until now that I'm overmultiplying essentially, making my answers too large... –  user182078 Mar 26 '12 at 2:28
    
I guess I'm a bit confused as to how I can break this down into n 2D arrays without first declaring n new arrays and then filling them up. obviously i can't first know n, so what can i do? i'm fairly stuck at this point... –  user182078 Mar 26 '12 at 3:14
    
I had been content to overlook the 3d array portion of the problem on the assumption that you knew more about it than I do :) -- I assumed you had a suitable definition of multiplication on 3d arrays, that you were comfortable using. However, there is a convenient mechanism to raise 2d arrays to powers that you might be able to extend to your 3d arrays. –  sarnold Mar 26 '12 at 21:56

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