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While going through Effective C++ (by Scott Meyers), I came across the following code that the author uses to illustrate how exceptions should be handled when copying data members from one object to another.

class Bitmap { ... };

class Widget {
  ...

private:
  Bitmap *pb;                                     // ptr to a heap-allocated object
};

Widget& Widget::operator=(const Widget& rhs)
{
  Bitmap *pOrig = pb;               // remember original pb
  pb = new Bitmap(*rhs.pb);         // make pb point to a copy of *pb
  delete pOrig;                     // delete the original pb
  return *this;
}

In the event that "new Bitmap" throws an exception, pb will remain unchanged. However, by deleting pOrig, the memory to which pb points has been freed. Isn't this dangerous? How is it any better than the following code

Widget& Widget::operator=(const Widget& rhs)

{
  if (this == &rhs) return *this;   // identity test: if a self-assignment,
                                    // do nothing
  delete pb;
  pb = new Bitmap(*rhs.pb);
  return *this;
}

Which (he claims) is bad because when "new Bitmap" yields an exception (either because there is insufficient memory for the allocation or because Bitmap's copy constructor throws one), the Widget will end up holding a pointer to a deleted Bitmap

I checked the book errata, but found no mention of this example. Am I missing something obvious? Also, can someone suggest a better way of handling this exception?

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The delete pOrig; will be executed if and only if pb = new Bitmap(*rhs.pb); succeeds. If the allocation fails, then no more of this ctor will execute at all -- instead, the stack will be unwound, and execution will go from whatever part of the Bitmap constructor threw the exception, directly to the handler for whatever exception was thrown. The only stop along the way will be destroying the variables local to the ctor, but since the only local variable is a pointer, destroying it is pretty much a nop.

In the case that the Widget object contained any other member variables, any of those that had been completely constructed would also be destroyed as part of the stack unwinding, but since it doesn't have any (shown) that's irrelevant here.

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Got it, thanks. –  Sam Mar 26 '12 at 2:24
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The main principle of exception safety is that you don't want to mutate your data of record before an operation that can throw an exception.

The second example does not pass this, because the delete mutates the data of record, which is followed by the new operator which might throw, leaving the data in an incomplete state.

The first example does not have this problem, since the none of the data is mutated until the new operation that could throw. There is no possibility that the data will be left in an incomplete state.

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In the event that "new Bitmap" throws an exception, pb will remain unchanged. However, by deleting pOrig, the memory to which pb points has been freed. Isn't this dangerous?

No, you made an incorrect assumption about pOrig being deleted and possibly where exceptions can be thrown. In the original code:

Widget& Widget::operator=(const Widget& rhs)
{
  Bitmap *pOrig = pb; // <-- this can't throw
  pb = new Bitmap(*rhs.pb); // <-- this can throw
  delete pOrig; // <-- this can't throw
  return *this; // <-- this can't throw
}

Calling operator new here is the only place where the code might throw. If it does, pb will not be assigned the result. It will point to the previous Bitmap and the class will remain in a valid state. It also will not continue to delete the pOrig pointee. The result is that if an exception is thrown, there is no leak and the class remains in a valid state.

As for your code, it is not exception safe.

Widget& Widget::operator=(const Widget& rhs)
{
  ...
  delete pb;
  pb = new Bitmap(*rhs.pb);
  ...
}

Once you freed the memory associated with pb, you put the class in an invalid state. It is thus dangerous to throw until you put the class back into a valid state. If operator new throws here, you are screwed and your Widget class is left in an invalid state as a result of pb being a dangling pointer. It would be as if you didn't execute the second line at all.

Do yourself a favor and save yourself the heart ache. Use RAII and smart pointers and this will be so much easier.

Widget& Widget::operator=(const Widget& rhs)
{
  unique_ptr<Bitmap> new_bitmap(new Bitmap(*rhs.pb));
  pb.swap(new_bitmap); // make pb a unique_ptr as well
  return *this;
}
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