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thread.join() will call thread.wait(), but who and when notifies (either with thread.notify() or notifyAll()) the thread.wait()?

As we know, thread join will wait for the thread to be completed, but who calls notify on it?

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

Edit:

Oh, you are talking about inside of the Thread object itself. Inside of join() we do see a wait(). Something like:

while (isAlive()) {
    wait(0);
}

The notify() for this is handled by the Thread subsystem. When the run() method finishes, the notify() is called on the Thread object. I'm not sure if the code that actually calls notify() can be seen -- it seems to be done in native code.


No user code needs to call notify() on that Thread object. The Java Thread code handles this internally. Once the thread finishes, the join() call will return.

For example, the following code will execute fine and the join() call will return fine without any wait() or notify() calls.

Thread thread = new Thread(new Runnable() {
   public void run() {
      // no-op, just return immediately
   }
});
thread.start();
thread.join();

It is important to note that this behavior should probably not be relied upon. The notify() call is internal to the thread system. You should use join() if you are waiting for a thread to finish.

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3ks, But you can take a look at thread.class source code or debug it with fastdebug jdk, you can find when you call join, you will wait at wait(). So I think you are wrong at this point. But my quesiton is that who notify it when waiting inside join method. – jiafu Mar 26 '12 at 3:24
    
@jiafu I've edited my answer. The notify() is called from within the Thread subsystem. I'm not sure you can see that code. It may be in native land. – Gray Mar 26 '12 at 3:34
    
Thanks for your update. As you mentioned:"When the run() method finishes, the notify() is called on the Thread object." That is my expected answer. But We both feel that "I'm not sure if the code that actually calls notify() can be seen". Thanks. ps: how you know the fact "When the run() method finishes, the notify() is called on the Thread object". I can't find any document in internet related with this viewpoint. haha – jiafu Mar 26 '12 at 4:21
    
@jiafu Because that's how it works. The code is in a while loop: while (isAlive()) { wait(0); }. It will call wait() until the thread is no longer alive. At the end of the run() method the native code sets alive to false and notifies the Thread. – Gray Mar 26 '12 at 4:25
    
"At the end of the run() method the native code sets alive to false and notifies the " are you sure ? I can't get fimilar with native code language. So I can't make sure this. IF you sure of it. I sure it too. Many thank to you ! – jiafu Mar 26 '12 at 4:29

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