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I am using shared memory for inter-process communication in an unsafe class. Part of the memory is reserved to hold a fixed array of int.

Basically, I have a method that sets up the shared memory. Something like this:

private int* sizePtr;

private ???* arrayPtr;

void SetupMemory(byte *pointerToSharedMem)

{

    this.sizePtr = (int*)pointerToSharedMem;
    pointerToSharedMem += sizeof(int);

    this.arrayPtr = (???*)pointerToSharedMem;
    pointerToSharedMem += sizeof(int) * FixedSizeOfArray;
}

How do I need to declare the pointer such that I can use a property

public int[] MyArray
{
    get
    {
       return some magic with this.arrayPtr;
    }
}

ETA: If possible, I would like to avoid structs and I definitely want to avoid copying data around. I was hoping for some kind of cast construct to use a pointer to the data in shared memory, such that the data can be used immediately (i.e. without copying).

share|improve this question

Actually, I can think of another answer.

This may very well get ugly if you don't use it just right, though.

Be careful!

public unsafe class UnsafeArray
{
    private readonly int* _start;
    public readonly int Length;

    public UnsafeArray(int* start, int enforceLength = 0)
    {
        this._start = start;
        this.Length = enforceLength > 0 ? enforceLength : int.MaxValue;
    }

    public int this[int index]
    {
        get { return _start[index]; }
        set
        {
            if (index >= this.Length)
            {
                throw new IndexOutOfRangeException();
            }

            _start[index] = value;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Inspired by this answer - thank you! - I will simply use a Set and a Get method with an index as parameter. It's not as nice a solution as I was hoping for but it is pretty straightforward and it does the trick without copying data around. – Harald Mar 26 '12 at 4:39
1  
Glad to hear. If you keep the indexer, it acts as Get and Set methods, and saves you some writing, making it even look more like an array. – SimpleVar Mar 26 '12 at 4:47

Does it need to be a pointer, or can you copy the data over?

If that's okay, then check out this link

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa330463(v=vs.71).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
It needs to a be a pointer. This array is used very often and copying data around is too much of a penalty (unless, of course, there absolutely is no other way). – Harald Mar 26 '12 at 3:37

In C# 2.0 and above, a struct can be declared with an embedded array, in an unsafe context:

namespace FixedSizeBuffers
{
    internal unsafe struct MyBuffer
    {
        public fixed int fixedBuffer[128];
    }

    internal unsafe class MyClass
    {
        public MyBuffer myBuffer = default(MyBuffer);
    }

    internal class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            MyClass myClass = new MyClass();

            unsafe
            {
                // Pin the buffer to a fixed location in memory.
                fixed (int* intPtr = myClass.myBuffer.fixedBuffer)
                {
                    *intPtr = someIntValue;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zycewsya(v=vs.100).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
is it possible without using a struct? – Harald Mar 26 '12 at 3:35
    
That's a good question. Probably not; C# needs a managed container to hold the unsafe item. You can reference that managed container elsewhere in your program without problems, because it is a managed container. – Robert Harvey Mar 26 '12 at 3:40
    
Thanks for the code. However, in your example you have the array pre-declared. In my example, I need to derive the array from a pointer that points to an area in shared memory. – Harald Mar 26 '12 at 3:43
    
Then I think you want Marshal.PtrToStructure. Something like this: stackoverflow.com/a/2338182/102937 – Robert Harvey Mar 26 '12 at 3:52
    
Marshal.PtrToStructure (and similar) allocates an object and then copies data from unmanaged memory into it. I am still hopeful that it can be done without copying data. – Harald Mar 26 '12 at 3:59

Can't think of anything better than memcpy.

[DllImport("msvcrt.dll", EntryPoint = "memcpy", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl, SetLastError = false)]
public static extern IntPtr memcpy(IntPtr dest, IntPtr src, UIntPtr count);

private static unsafe int[] GetArray(int* ptr, uint length)
{
    var ints = new int[length];

    fixed (int* pInts = ints)
    {
        memcpy(new IntPtr(pInts), new IntPtr(ptr), new UIntPtr(length));
    }

    return ints;
}
share|improve this answer

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