Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just encountered a weird error which saying that find is not a member of std.

error C2039: 'find' : is not a member of 'std'

error C3861: 'find': identifier not found

Basically, I want to find whether a string can be found in the vector

Any idea why does this happen? the code assist tells me that there is find method in std.

so this is basically what I did :

#include "OperatorUtil.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <sstream>


using namespace saeConfig;


namespace operatorUtil
{
   bool isIn(const Filter filter, const SearchKey key)
   {

    bool result = false;


    string dimensionStr = key.dimensions.getValue(filter.getFilterKey());
    if(filter.getFilterValues().size()>0)
    {
        vector<string> vstr= filter.getFilterValues();
        std::vector<string>::iterator it;        // Iterator
        it = std::find(vstr.begin(), vstr.end(), dimensionStr);  //ERROR LINE  
        // Check do we have the object in the queue
        if(it == vstr.end())    
        {           
            result =true;
        }
    }

    return result;
   }
}
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried any googling? Also, this code sample is not compilable, because I didn't have rest of your code. For the future try to post sscce.org code samples - it is much easier to give the correct answer. –  Rafał Rawicki Mar 26 '12 at 7:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

std::find is defined in the <algorithm> header. Add to the beginning:

#include <algorithm>
share|improve this answer
    
it works. Can give me reason why this happens? –  Rudy Mar 26 '12 at 7:14
8  
@Rudy Because the C++ standard says std::find is in the <algorithm> header. –  juanchopanza Mar 26 '12 at 7:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.