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I have several controls in one of my applications, which all obviously extend the Control class.

I need several of these to have some shared interface, so I have created an interface which covers the shared functionality.

Is there any way I can enforce that my interface can only be given to a subclass of Control?

i.e. (Pseudo)

interface IEmbed

class MyControl1 : Control, IEmbed

class MyControl2 : Control, IEmbed

class MyClass : IEmbed

Ideally I would like the compiler to fail here, because MyClass tries to implement IEmbed even though it is not a control.

Have I gone about this the wrong way or is there a way to enforce this behaviour?

Edit

I've been asked why I wish to enforce this behaviour.

I have a method which I want to take any IEmbed implementation and add it as a child control to another element.

This is all well and good, but Controls.Add() refuses to take an IEmbed object, and this doesn't compile.

I figured if I tell the compiler that anything implementing IEmbed has to be a control, it might work?

share|improve this question
    
Why should the interface be given only to a sub-class of Control ? Perhaps do you need to cast it back to Control? If so, just add a method in the interface called for instance Control GetControl() so, even if the interface it is not a sub-class of Control, it must provide the associated Control and you can avoid the cast... –  digEmAll Mar 26 '12 at 8:22
    
Please see edit. –  KingCronus Mar 26 '12 at 9:00
    
@digEmAll If OP intends for all implementations to be Controls, then he precisely needs to subclass Control (see Strillo's answer). I imagine an interface being nicer due to not tying anything to a particular GUI framework, but a Control GetControl() method in it breaks all that. –  Jacek Gorgoń Mar 26 '12 at 9:06
    
@JacekGorgoń: of course it depends on the OP needings. Mine was just an example, and IMO a method or property like that is not so ugly (it allows to separate the IEmbed instance from the Control if you want, something like controller/control) but yes, probably an abstract class like Strillo's answer is better. :) –  digEmAll Mar 26 '12 at 9:37

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, there is no way to enforce this at compile time.

You could enforce it at runtime by having your framework code test if obj is Control before using obj as an IEmbed instance.

Update: Based on feedback from comments, it looks like a good solution would be to inherit from an intermediate abstract class EmbedControl : Control and make your method accept an EmbedControl instead of an IEmbed (in this case there would not really be a need to keep the interface, as you can simply use abstract methods in the base class).

While the above will work nicely, under some circumstances it is undesirable to force the implementors of "client" classes to derive from your own intermediate class, even if you need them to derive from the "base" class Control at the same time. In this case, another good approach would be to use generics:

public void DoSomethingWithControl<T>(T control) where T : Control, IEmbed
share|improve this answer
    
I agree, the problem is that we don't to know why the OP needs to enforce this behavior, and probably there's another way to achieve that... –  digEmAll Mar 26 '12 at 8:28
    
I think I am going to rethink my design... –  KingCronus Mar 26 '12 at 8:52
    
I have a method which I want to take any IEmbed implementation and add it as a child control to another element. This is all well and good, but Controls.Add() refuses to take an IEmbed object, and this doesn't compile. I figured if I tell the compiler that anything implementing IEmbed has to be a control, it might work? –  KingCronus Mar 26 '12 at 9:00
    
@AdamKing: This makes it easier to answer the question concretely, thanks. Take a look at the updated answer. –  Jon Mar 26 '12 at 9:44

I don't think there is a way to enforce something like this - but I don't think you really need to as you just can check at runtime if the instance of your interface is a Control.

BUT: alternativley just use a abstract class (derived from Control) instead of the interface:

abstract class EmbedControl
   : Control
{
   // your abstract members
}

class MyControl1 : EmbedControl
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If you need to do perform such a check then I'd suggest you review your design. An interface is merely a contract and does not put limitations on what can adhere to it. If the type is important then you should try a different approach, such as a base class. How about using an abstract class (where you can specify type constraints) that requires inheritor to implement the methods of your interface?

interface IInterface
{
    void Method1();
    int Property1 { get; }
}

abstract class BaseClass: Control, IInterface
{
    public abstract void Method1();
    public abstract int Property1 { get; }
}

This will only ensure that any class deriving from BaseClass is both a Control and implements IInterface.

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What not using a declaration and the checking T is a Control ?

Also, I agree with what's written abaove, why should an interface be a type ? It seems like a bad deszign where you know you'll cast your interface back into a control later...

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Actually i cant imagine why do you need that, but Control is a descendant of IComponent. Maybe you should inherits from that?

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Well, the solution I am providing is a very ugly one, but it fails while compiling.

public interface IEmbed<T> where T: Control
{
}

public class A :Control, IEmbed<A>
{
}

//this fails at compile time as B does not inherit from Control class.
public class B : IEmbed<B>
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
I mean it fails because B is not implementing Control. It is the behaviour asked. –  daryal Mar 26 '12 at 8:48
    
thx it was monday and missed the comment in code. I thought the code didn't compile in general. –  RvdK Mar 26 '12 at 8:55
2  
This is hardly a good solution. A developer might easily break this not knowing the purpose of T and declaring class C : IEmbed<Control>. –  Jacek Gorgoń Mar 26 '12 at 9:11
    
@JacekGorgoń you are right but I stated this in the solution. I do not think there is a direct solution to this problem in c#. –  daryal Mar 26 '12 at 9:18

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