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I am working on the os161 project. I create a file which include the array.h provide in src/kern/include. When I compile, I had the error like this: ./../include/array.h:85: error: expected '=', ',', ';', 'asm' or 'attribute' before 'unsigned' ../../include/array.h:91: error: expected '=', ',', ';', 'asm' or 'attribute' before 'void'

the code is like:

#ifndef ARRAYINLINE
#define ARRAYINLINE INLINE
#endif

ARRAYINLINE unsigned    --------------line 85 error
array_num(const struct array *a)
{
    return a->num;
}

ARRAYINLINE void *     --------------line 91 error
array_get(const struct array *a, unsigned index)
{
    ARRAYASSERT(index < a->num);
    return a->v[index];
}

and this kind of error happened at every line has something like INLINE or ARRAYINLINE. This array.h file is provided and I made no change to it. Really cannot figure out why.

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Can you add the const struct array please? And a bit more code as well. What is your command to compile? –  Patapoom Mar 26 '12 at 9:22
    
Error says that the compiler is not able to understand what INLINE is. Maybe #define ARRAYINLINE INLINE is define ARRAYINLINE inline requesting the compiler to inline the functions? If not, is INLINE defined while compiling? –  another.anon.coward Mar 26 '12 at 9:22
2  
Try to get program text after preprocessor and show it. E.g. for gcc it's option "-E". The most probable variant is no definition of INLINE or strange one. –  Netch Mar 26 '12 at 9:30

2 Answers 2

I'm working on os161, too. INLINE is not defined, try using #define ARRAYINLINE inline instead.

[EDIT]

I checked my os161 revision. I found this line before the #define ARRAYINLINE INLINE

#define INLINE extern inline

So please check if your array.h also contains this line (115 in my case)

[/EDIT]

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I'm working on OS161 as well, this error could be generated if you have a random character outside of your function. Example:

#include <...>
...
e //<-this random character that could have been mistyped.

sys_fork(...){
...
}
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