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Please look at the following code. I am new to Python (1 week and counting) so still on a learning curve. Using a button click - driving a definition - attempting to change the label text. The GUI consists of three buttons: Variable1 (when pressed changes the variable to Variable1) Variable2 (when pressed changes the variable to variable2) Print Variable (when pressed prints the variable)

I've tried various things to get the label text to update - to no avail. I did try global variables which I could'nt get to work.

Any help would be much appreciated.

from Tkinter import *
import time

class GridDemo( Frame ):
    def changevar1 (self): #change variable 
        global variable
        self.variable = "Variable1"
        print "You have changed the variable to:" , self.variable
        time.sleep(0.5)

    def changevar2 (self): #change variable
        global variable
        self.variable = "Variable2"
        print "You have changed the variable to:" , self.variable
        time.sleep(0.5)

    def printvar (self):  # print variable
        print "The variable is:" , self.variable
        print ""
        time.sleep(0.5)

    def __init__( self ):
        Frame.__init__( self )
        self.master.title( "Grid Demo" )
        global variable
        self.variable = "Start Variable"

        self.master.rowconfigure( 0, weight = 1 )
        self.master.columnconfigure( 0, weight = 1 )
        self.grid( sticky = W+E+N+S )

        self.button1 = Button( self, text = "Variable 1", command = self.changevar1 )
        self.button1.grid( row = 1, column = 1,  sticky = W+E+N+S )

        self.button2 = Button( self, text = "Variable 2", command = self.changevar2 )
        self.button2.grid( row = 1, column = 2, sticky = W+E+N+S )

        self.button3 = Button( self, text = "print variable" , command = self.printvar)
        self.button3.grid( row = 1, column = 3, sticky = W+E+N+S )

        self.label4 = Label(self, text = self.variable)
        self.label4.grid( row = 2, column = 1, columnspan = 2, sticky = W+E+N+S )

        self.rowconfigure( 1, weight = 1 )
        self.columnconfigure( 1, weight = 1 )

def main():
    GridDemo().mainloop() 
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Use the StringVar and textvariable. Here's the working code, I've comment what I changed.

from Tkinter import *
import time

class GridDemo( Frame ):
    def changevar1 (self): #change variable 
        self.label4String.set("Variable1") # use set method to change
        print "You have changed the variable to:" , self.label4String.get()
        time.sleep(0.5)

    def changevar2 (self): #change variable
        self.label4String.set("Variable2") # use set method to change
        print "You have changed the variable to:" , self.label4String.get()
        time.sleep(0.5)

    def printvar (self):  # print variable
        print "The variable is:" ,  self.label4String.get()
        print # just this is enough, no need to add ""
        time.sleep(0.5)

    def __init__( self ):
        Frame.__init__( self )
        self.master.title( "Grid Demo" )
        self.variable = "Start Variable"

        self.master.rowconfigure( 0, weight = 1 )
        self.master.columnconfigure( 0, weight = 1 )
        self.grid( sticky = W+E+N+S )

        self.button1 = Button( self, text = "Variable 1", command = self.changevar1 )
        self.button1.grid( row = 1, column = 1,  sticky = W+E+N+S )

        self.button2 = Button( self, text = "Variable 2", command = self.changevar2 )
        self.button2.grid( row = 1, column = 2, sticky = W+E+N+S )

        self.button3 = Button( self, text = "print variable" , command = self.printvar)
        self.button3.grid( row = 1, column = 3, sticky = W+E+N+S )

        self.label4String = StringVar() # use Tk's StringVar
        self.label4 = Label(self, textvariable=self.label4String) # bind a StringVar to textvariable attr
        self.label4.grid( row = 2, column = 1, columnspan = 2, sticky = W+E+N+S )

        self.rowconfigure( 1, weight = 1 )
        self.columnconfigure( 1, weight = 1 )

def main():
    GridDemo().mainloop() 

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
share|improve this answer
    
Ray - thankyou - amazed at the speed of reply. –  DaveH Mar 26 '12 at 10:47

You can associate a variable with a widget, but you can also the text (or any attribute) of a widget with the configure method. For example:

self.label4.configure(text="hello, world!")

You can define your buttons so that they send the appropriate string. For example:

define a couple buttons:

self.button1 = Button(frame, text="Variable 1", 
                      command=lambda message="Variable 1": self.changevar(message))
self.button2 = Button(frame, text="Variable 2", 
                      command=lambda message="Variable 2": self.changevar(message))

define the callback:

def changevar(self, message):
    self.label4.configure(text=message)

By the way, I strongly recommend not using from Tkinter import *. It's a bad practice. Instead, import Tk and fully qualify your functions. For example:

import Tkinter as tk
...
frame = tk.Frame(...)

Doing an import * from any module is bad. Doing from Tkinter is particularly bad for modern versions of python. Tkinter has what are called "themed" widgets in the module ttk. These have the same class names as the normal widgets -- there is a Tkinter.Button and an ttk.Button.

Doing import * prevents you from easily using both in the same file. For any complex app you're going to want to mix and match to get the look you want. If you use the preferred importing style you can then do tk.Label(...) and ttk.Label(...) and your code becomes crystal clear which widget set you are using.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I think defining a single changevar and then use lambda is better than defining several changevar methods. –  Ray Mar 26 '12 at 15:15

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