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Take this example Proc:

proc = Proc.new {|x,y,&block| block.call(x,y,self.instance_method)}

It takes two arguments, x and y, and also a block.

I want to execute that block using different values for self. Something like this nearly works:

some_object.instance_exec("x arg", "y arg", &proc)

However that doesn't allow you to pass in a block. This also doesn't work

some_object.instance_exec("x arg", "y arg", another_proc, &proc)

nor does

some_object.instance_exec("x arg", "y arg", &another_proc, &proc)

I'm not sure what else could work here. Is this possible, and if so how do you do it?

Edit: Basically if you can get this rspec file to pass by changing the change_scope_of_proc method, you have solved my problem.

require 'rspec'

class SomeClass
  def instance_method(x)
    "Hello #{x}"
  end
end

class AnotherClass
  def instance_method(x)
    "Goodbye #{x}"
  end

  def make_proc
    Proc.new do |x, &block|
      instance_method(block.call(x))
    end
  end
end

def change_scope_of_proc(new_self, proc)
  # TODO fix me!!!
  proc
end

describe "change_scope_of_proc" do
  it "should change the instance method that is called" do
    some_class = SomeClass.new
    another_class = AnotherClass.new
    proc = another_class.make_proc
    fixed_proc = change_scope_of_proc(some_class, proc)
    result = fixed_proc.call("Wor") do |x|
      "#{x}ld"
    end

    result.should == "Hello World"
  end
end
share|improve this question
    
+1 for supplying test surfacing the issue explicitly –  dbenhur Mar 27 '12 at 14:37
    
+1 for the test, thank you, that makes it very easy to see what you want. –  joelparkerhenderson Mar 29 '12 at 6:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+150

To solve this, you need to re-bind the Proc to the new class.

Here's your solution, leveraging some good code from Rails core_ext:

require 'rspec'

# Same as original post

class SomeClass
  def instance_method(x)
    "Hello #{x}"
  end
end

# Same as original post

class AnotherClass
  def instance_method(x)
    "Goodbye #{x}"
  end

  def make_proc
    Proc.new do |x, &block|
      instance_method(block.call(x))
    end
  end
end

### SOLUTION ###

# From activesupport lib/active_support/core_ext/kernel/singleton_class.rb

module Kernel
  # Returns the object's singleton class.
  def singleton_class
    class << self
      self
    end
  end unless respond_to?(:singleton_class) # exists in 1.9.2

  # class_eval on an object acts like singleton_class.class_eval.
  def class_eval(*args, &block)
    singleton_class.class_eval(*args, &block)
  end
end

# From activesupport lib/active_support/core_ext/proc.rb 

class Proc #:nodoc:
  def bind(object)
    block, time = self, Time.now
    object.class_eval do
      method_name = "__bind_#{time.to_i}_#{time.usec}"
      define_method(method_name, &block)
      method = instance_method(method_name)
      remove_method(method_name)
      method
    end.bind(object)
  end
end

# Here's the method you requested

def change_scope_of_proc(new_self, proc)
  return proc.bind(new_self)
end

# Same as original post

describe "change_scope_of_proc" do
  it "should change the instance method that is called" do
    some_class = SomeClass.new
    another_class = AnotherClass.new
    proc = another_class.make_proc
    fixed_proc = change_scope_of_proc(some_class, proc)
    result = fixed_proc.call("Wor") do |x|
      "#{x}ld"
    end
    result.should == "Hello World"
  end
end
share|improve this answer
1  
Thankyou, this is perfect! For the tldrers, from the activesupport gem, if you require 'active_support/core_ext' you get access to the Proc#bind method, which does exactly what I required. Unfortunately, it has been depreciated in HEAD due to a symbol memory leak. It isn't likely there is a better solution though if this is what the rails team ended up using. Also, the code that was used to replaced uses of Proc#bind doesn't pass my test - I wonder if they are aware that functionality has been lost... –  David Miani Mar 29 '12 at 7:31

I don't think you can do this, and the trouble isn't passing multiple blocks. Proc's and blocks are closures and capture their bindings at the point of creation. self is part of that binding, so even if you change self with instance_eval, when you call the proc/block it executes in its binding, with the self it closed over:

$ irb
irb(main):001:0> class Foo; def mkproc; Proc.new { puts "#{self.class}:#{object_id}" }; end; end
=> nil
irb(main):002:0> p = Foo.new.mkproc
=> #<Proc:0x00000001b04338@(irb):1>
irb(main):003:0> p.call
Foo:14164520
=> nil
irb(main):004:0> 'bar'.instance_exec { puts "#{self.class}:#{object_id}"; p.call }
String:16299940
Foo:14164520

Ruby will let you capture a closure's Binding with Kernel#binding, but offers no way to set the binding associated with a Proc. You can specify a binding for the string version of Kernel#eval, but that still doesn't let you change the binding of a proc you call.

irb(main):005:0> class BindMe; def get_binding(p=nil); binding; end; end
=> nil
irb(main):006:0> b = BindMe.new.get_binding(p)
=> #<Binding:0x00000001f58e48>
irb(main):007:0> eval '"#{self.class}:#{object_id}"', b
=> "BindMe:14098300"
irb(main):008:0> eval '"#{self.class}:#{object_id}"', p.binding
=> "Foo:14164520"
irb(main):009:0> eval "p.call", b
Foo:14164520
share|improve this answer
2  
You can change the binding of self in a proc by passing it directly to instance_exec. For example, 'bar'.instance_exec &p outputs String:2151790940 when I tried it, showing that self was changed. The key point is procs called inside the proc given to instance_exec don't have their binding changed, which explains the output you were getting. So I don't think this proves one way or the other if what I want to do is possible or not. –  David Miani Mar 27 '12 at 9:35
    
Ah, nice observation. I think I see a way to use that to get your spec to pass, but have to run off to work now. I'll fiddle with this later. –  dbenhur Mar 27 '12 at 14:35

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