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I have following somewhat complex sql query which has horrible performance, 'certainly' due to the inner query inside the where clause. In some cases it takes over a minute. Does anybody know how to rewrite this query giving better performance?
The query:

SELECT DISTINCT t.id as taskId, t.name as taskName, 
  t.startdate as taskStartDate, t.enddate as taskEndDate, 
  t.proj_id as taskProjectId 
FROM PROJECT p, EMPL_PROJ ep, TASK t, TIMERECORD tr 
WHERE 
  ep.empl_id = ? AND 
  ep.proj_id = p.id AND 
  ep.proj_id = t.proj_id AND 
  ((p.startdate IS NULL AND p.enddate IS NULL) OR 
   (p.startdate IS NULL AND p.enddate >= ?) OR 
   (p.enddate IS NULL AND p.startdate <= ? + INTERVAL 6 DAY) OR 
   (p.startdate <= ? + INTERVAL 6 DAY AND p.enddate >= ?) ) AND 
  ((t.startdate IS NULL AND t.enddate IS NULL) OR 
   (t.startdate IS NULL AND t.enddate >= ?) OR 
   (t.enddate IS NULL AND t.startdate <= ? + INTERVAL 6 DAY) OR 
  (t.startdate <= ? + INTERVAL 6 DAY AND t.enddate >= ?)) AND 
  (
   (ep.empl_id = tr.empl_id AND 
    ep.proj_id = tr.proj_id AND 
    t.id = tr.task_id AND tr.day <= ? + INTERVAL 7 DAY AND 
    tr.day >= ? + INTERVAL -14 DAY
   ) OR 
   (
    (SELECT count(*) 
     FROM TIMERECORD tr2 
     WHERE 
     tr2.empl_id=ep.empl_id AND 
     tr2.proj_id=p.id AND tr2.day <= ? + INTERVAL 7 DAY AND 
     tr2.day >= ? + INTERVAL -14 DAY) <= 0
    )
  ) 

I'm using mysql server 5.1.40.

Edit (2): With the comments and answers I came to this query which executes under a second (not bad coming from almost a minute!)

SELECT DISTINCT t.id as taskId, t.name as taskName, 
  t.startdate as taskStartDate, t.enddate as taskEndDate, 
  t.proj_id as taskProjectId 
FROM (PROJECT p INNER JOIN EMPL_PROJ ep ON  ep.proj_id = p.id)  
  INNER JOIN TASK t ON p.id=t.proj_id 
  INNER JOIN TIMERECORD tr ON tr.empl_id=ep.empl_id AND tr.proj_id=ep.proj_id 
    AND tr.task_id=t.id
WHERE 
  ep.empl_id = ? AND 
  ((p.startdate IS NULL AND p.enddate IS NULL) OR 
   (p.startdate IS NULL AND p.enddate >= ?) OR 
   (p.enddate IS NULL AND p.startdate <= ? + INTERVAL 6 DAY) OR 
   (p.startdate <= ? + INTERVAL 6 DAY AND p.enddate >= ?) ) AND 
  ((t.startdate IS NULL AND t.enddate IS NULL) OR 
   (t.startdate IS NULL AND t.enddate >= ?) OR 
   (t.enddate IS NULL AND t.startdate <= ? + INTERVAL 6 DAY) OR 
   (t.startdate <= ? + INTERVAL 6 DAY AND t.enddate >= ?)) AND 
  (
   (
    tr.day <= ? + INTERVAL 7 DAY AND 
    tr.day >= ? + INTERVAL -14 DAY
   ) OR 
   (
    NOT EXISTS(SELECT *
      FROM TIMERECORD tr2 INNER JOIN EMPL_PROJ ON tr2.empl_id=EMPL_PROJ.empl_id 
        INNER JOIN PROJECT ON PROJECT.id=tr2.proj_id
      WHERE 
       tr2.day BETWEEN ? + INTERVAL -14 DAY AND ? + INTERVAL 7 DAY)
   )
  ) 
  ORDER BY p.id, t.id

Biggest contribution was the answer suggesting the NOT EXISTS approach (which I marked as being correct) and the comment not to mix the explicit and implicit JOIN's.

Thanks to all!

share|improve this question
2  
"probably" can be upgraded to "certainty" by trying the query with, and without, the suspect part to see if its introduction causes the slowness. Doing this may also allow you to clear away irrelevant code in an effort to create a SSCCE, thus making your question more applicable to others and more easily answerable –  Bohemian Mar 26 '12 at 12:34
1  
Step 1 would be using newer JOIN syntax instead of this old deprecated cross joins with where filters stuff. –  JNK Mar 26 '12 at 12:39
1  
@jb10210 INNER JOIN EMpl_Proj ep ON ep.proj_id = p.id for example. It makes the JOIN relationship much more obvious. –  JNK Mar 26 '12 at 12:54
2  
no commas in explicit joins –  HLGEM Mar 26 '12 at 13:56
2  
With the comma in your join statment you probaly made a cross join between empll_proj and task. That is why it si taking so long.YOu never ever want to mix implicit and explicit joins or the results are often unfortunate. But you should not be writing implict joins ever, they were replaced 20 years ago and there is no excuse for using them in 2012. –  HLGEM Mar 26 '12 at 14:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are using COUNT(*) when you seem to only need a NOT EXISTS...

(
(SELECT count(*) 
 FROM TIMERECORD tr2 
 WHERE 
 tr2.empl_id=ep.empl_id AND 
 tr2.proj_id=p.id AND tr2.day <= ? + INTERVAL 7 DAY AND 
 tr2.day >= ? + INTERVAL -14 DAY) <= 0
)

Replace with

(
NOT EXISTS(SELECT * 
 FROM TIMERECORD tr2 
 WHERE 
 tr2.empl_id=ep.empl_id AND 
 tr2.proj_id=p.id AND tr2.day <= ? + INTERVAL 7 DAY AND 
 tr2.day >= ? + INTERVAL -14 DAY)
)

Now if a TIMERECORD does exist that part of the where clause will short circuit to FALSE (NOT TRUE) without having to count every TIMERECORD.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Great remark! It already significantly reduces the query response time (from +10s to about 5-6s). But the same query without the select in the where clause (which sends more data) runs in about 1s. So this should be reduced somewhat more. –  jb10210 Mar 26 '12 at 13:52

Get rid of the sub query.

(1). Compute the sub query separately with the columns empl_id,proj_id,count(*) for all empl_ids & proj_ids where the day falls in the required range. This is a simple group by query.

select empl_id,proj_id,count(*) as ct from TIMERECORD 
where day between (? + INTERVAL -14 DAY) and (? + INTERVAL 7 DAY)
group by empl_id,proj_id;

Call this result set B

(2). Compute the remaining query as you are doing now. Call this resultset A

(3). Do A left outer join B using columns empl_id,proj_id that are common in A & B

then in the where clause you can check the value in B.ct column, it will be null for all empl_id,proj_id combinations for which no entry was found in TIMERECORD table for the given time range.

Actually you don't even need count(*) since you are not bothered about the actual count. But let me not complicate it more than necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 - you've been around 11 months and should understand how code tagging works by now. –  JNK Mar 26 '12 at 14:01
    
@Priyank thanks for the between keyword, didn't know it existed! +1 –  jb10210 Mar 26 '12 at 15:19
    
@JNK Who are you? I don't care if something like that offends you so much. More so if ur going to be rude about it. I have my explanation about why I didn't do it but I don't owe you one. –  Dojo Mar 26 '12 at 16:03
    
@Priyank - I'm just another user. I wasn't being rude, but not editing code is extremely lazy and shows you don't really care about the people who have to read your post. I didn't imply you owed me an explanation, and TBH I didn't have to explain the downvote but I did. –  JNK Mar 26 '12 at 16:05
    
@JNK I wouldn't have replied if I didn't care. Secondly I don't use stackoverflow that much to know all its features. 11 months says nothing about how much I use it. –  Dojo Mar 26 '12 at 16:17

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