Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to plot email from and to in world. For example, I received the following number of emails from the following countries and I live in USA.

recievedcountry <- c("India", "China", "France", "Chile", "Australia", "Chad",
                    "Nepal", "Burma")
rfrequency <- c(12, 20, 5, 2, 12, 1, 3, 2) # frequency of emails 
sendcountry <- c("Canda", "USA", "France", "India", "China", "Japan")
sfrequency <- c(14, 108, 12, 15, 18, 4)

This what I tried but I do not know how to conect with lines:

require(fields)
world(xlim=c(-90,90),ylim=c(-180,180), xaxt = "s", yaxt = "s")
grid()

The following is my hypothesize model:

enter image description here

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This has been thought before. Look at this blog entry, it describes how to construct such a map very carefully.

http://flowingdata.com/2011/05/11/how-to-map-connections-with-great-circles/

share|improve this answer

Based on AdresT (thanks !) link provided above I could answer my own question except, line thinkness proportional to number of emails

Here is code: I used random data without searching exact longitude and latitude for each location.

library(maps)
library(geosphere)
map("world", col = "green4", bg="#F5FFFA", lwd=0.05)
myposition <- c(-74, 40) # my position (where I am opening emails)

rlong <- c(75, 105, 135, - 10.2,  45.2, -30.4, 105, 35, -150, 
   10.2,  145.2, 30.4) # received lat
rlat <- c(30, 43, 23, 12, 68, 55.6, 30, 43, 23, 12, 68, 55.6) # received long
nrecived <- c(4, 10, 5, 2, 4, 10, 4, 10, 5, 2, 4, 10 )     # number of email received
slong <- c(85, 85, 55, -40.2,  45.2, -30.4,45, 95, 55, 40.2,  55.2, 60.4 ) # send lat
slat <- c(10, 43, 13, 12, 68, 55.6,10, 43, 13, 12, 68, 55.6 ) # send long
nsend <- c(4, 10, 5, 2, 4, 10, 4, 10, 5, 2, 4, 10 )     # number of email send

mydf <- data.frame (rlat, rlong, nrecived, slat, slong, nsend)

for (i in 1: length (mydf) ) {
            send <- gcIntermediate(c(mydf[i,]$slong, mydf[i,]$slat), c(-74, 40), 
                   n=100, addStartEnd=TRUE)
            lines (send, col = "blue", lwd = mydf[i, "nsend"]) # edited 
                                                                following suggestion 
            received <- gcIntermediate(c(mydf[i,]$rlong, mydf[i,]$rlat), c(-74, 40), 
             n=100,  addStartEnd=TRUE)
            lines (received , col = "red", lwd = mydf[i, "nrecived"])
            }

The output map: enter image description here

If somebody can help to thickness of line proportional to number of emails will be great !

After fixing following line size suggestion from Roman Luštrik,

enter image description here

Line size to broad may be need to reclass into smaller numbers !

share|improve this answer
1  
If you change lwd=1.2 to lwd = mydf[i, "nsend"], does it solve your line thickness problem? –  Roman Luštrik Mar 30 '12 at 14:12
    
yes, thanks, I already incorporated the suggestion –  jon Mar 30 '12 at 14:29
    
You can rescale your current lwd to something more functional. You can divide by 0.8 or something to that effect. –  Roman Luštrik Mar 30 '12 at 22:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.