Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an array of strings of the form:

@source = (
     "something,something2,third"
    ,"something,something3   ,third"
    ,"something,something4"
    ,"something,something 5" # Note the space in the middle of the word
);

I need a regex which will extract the second of the comma separated words, BUT without the trailing spaces, putting those second words in an array.

@expected_result = ("something2","something3","something4","something 5");

What is the most readable way of achieving this?

I have 3 possibilities, neither of which seems optimal readability wise:

  1. Pure regex and then capture $1

    @result = map { (/[^,]+,([^,]*[^, ]) *(,|$)/ )[0] } @source;
    
  2. Split on commas (this is NOT a CSV so no parsing needed), then trim:

    @result = map { my @s = split(","), $s[1] =~ s/ *$//; $s[1] } @source;
    
  3. Put split and trim into nested maps

    @result = map { s/ *$//; $_ } map { (split(","))[1] } @source;
    

Which one of these is better? Any other even more readable alternative I'm not thinking of?

share|improve this question
4  
Have you considered using a CSV library? –  Wayne Conrad Mar 26 '12 at 13:49
    
Here is another one to question readability: /(?<=,)([^\s,]+)/ :P –  Ashley Mar 26 '12 at 14:02
    
@Ashley: I think you mean /(?<=,)([^,]*[^ ,])/: it's only trailing spaces that need to be forbidden. –  ruakh Mar 26 '12 at 14:17
    
@ruakh, did you try mine? :P –  Ashley Mar 26 '12 at 14:22
    
@Ashley: I hadn't, but I have now, and my comment stands. print("abc,def ghi,jkl" =~ /(?<=,)([^\s,]+)/) prints def instead of def ghi. –  ruakh Mar 26 '12 at 14:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use named capture groups and give names to subpatterns with (DEFINE) to greatly improve readability.

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use 5.10.0;  # for named capture buffer and (?&...)

my $second_trimmed_field_pattern = qr/
  (?&FIRST_FIELD) (?&SEP) (?<f2> (?&SECOND_FIELD))

  (?(DEFINE)
    # The separator is a comma preceded by optional whitespace.
    # NOTE: the format simple comma separators, NOT full CSV, so
    # we don't have to worry about processing escapes or quoted
    # fields.
    (?<SEP>  \s* ,)

    # A field stops matching as soon as it sees a separator
    # or end-of-string, so it matches in similar fashion to
    # a pattern with a non-greedy quantifier.
    (?<FIELD> (?: (?! (?&SEP) | $) .)+ )

    # The first field is anchored at start-of-string.
    (?<FIRST_FIELD>  ^  (?&FIELD))

    # The second field looks like any other field. The name
    # captures our intent for its use in the main pattern.
    (?<SECOND_FIELD> (?&FIELD))
  )
/x;

In action:

my @source = (
     "something,something2,third"
    ,"something,something3   ,third"
    ,"something,something4"
    ,"something,something 5" # Note the space in the middle of the word
);

for (@source) {
  if (/$second_trimmed_field_pattern/) {
    print "[$+{f2}]\n";

    #print "[$1]\n";  # or do it the old-fashioned way
  }
  else {
    chomp;
    print "no match for [$_]\n";
  }
}

Output:

[something2]
[something3]
[something4]
[something 5]

You can express it similarly to older perls. Below, I confine the pieces to the lexical scope of a sub to show that they all work together as a unit.

sub make_second_trimmed_field_pattern {
  my $sep = qr/
    # The separator is a comma preceded by optional whitespace.
    # NOTE: the format simple comma separators, NOT full CSV, so
    # we don't have to worry about processing escapes or quoted
    # fields.

    \s* ,
  /x;

  my $field = qr/
    # A field stops matching as soon as it sees a separator
    # or end-of-string, so it matches in similar fashion to
    # a pattern with a non-greedy quantifier.
    (?:
        # the next character to be matched is not the
        # beginning of a separator sequence or
        # end-of-string
        (?! $sep | $ )

        # ... so consume it
        .
    )+  # ... as many times as possible
  /x;

  qr/ ^ $field $sep ($field) /x;
}

Use it as in

my @source = ...;  # same as above

my $second_trimmed_field_pattern = make_second_trimmed_field_pattern;
for (@source) {
  if (/$second_trimmed_field_pattern/) {
    print "[$1]\n";
  }
  else {
    chomp;
    print "no match for [$_]\n";
  }
}

Output:

$ perl5.8.8 prog
[something2]
[something3]
[something4]
[something 5]
share|improve this answer
    
Lovely! Except we are stuck with 5.8 for now. +1! –  DVK Mar 26 '12 at 21:09
    
@DVK Thanks! See updated answer. –  Greg Bacon Mar 27 '12 at 19:22

Of those possibilities, I think #2 is the clearest, though I think I'd adjust it slightly to include the spaces in the split:

@result = map { my @s = split(/ *(?:,|$)/); $s[1] } @source;

(For that matter, I might actually write /[ ]*(?:,|$)/, with a no-op character class, just so it's a bit more visible what the * is quantifying.)

Edited to add: Whoops, I had a stupid mistake before, where this wouldn't remove the trailing space from something like "foo, bar ". Now that I've fixed that mistake, the result isn't so nice and simple, and I'm no longer sure if I recommend the above!

share|improve this answer

I'd have done:

my @result = map /,(.*?[^\s,])\s*(?:,|\z)/, @source;
share|improve this answer

Regular expressions are generally not "readable" in the conventional sense. They are more analogous to a complex mathematical formula. If readability is a concern then consider using comments (regex supports embedded comments).

This page provides a good overview: http://www.perl.com/pub/2004/01/16/regexps.html

An example from that page:

$_ =~ m/^                         # anchor at beginning of line
          The\ quick\ (\w+)\ fox    # fox adjective
          \ (\w+)\ over             # fox action verb
          \ the\ (\w+) dog          # dog adjective
          (?:                       # whitespace-trimmed comment:
            \s* \# \s*              #   whitespace and comment token
            (.*?)                   #   captured comment text; non-greedy!
            \s*                     #   any trailing whitespace
          )?                        # this is all optional
          $                         # end of line anchor
         /x;                        # allow whitespace

Come to think of it, if readability is an issue why the hell are you using perl? ;)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for using commented regex, though I'd hesitate to accept since your answer doesn't actually shows commented regex I need. –  DVK Mar 26 '12 at 15:05
    
You only write unreadable perl, SpliFF? Sorry to hear that. –  ysth Mar 27 '12 at 3:26
@result = map { /,([^,]*?)\s*(?:,|$)/ } @source;
share|improve this answer
    
@stackoverflow, OP does not say anything about leading spaces –  perreal Mar 26 '12 at 16:13

This is best handled with split, which will remove any whitespace preceding the commas for you. Just split on /\s*(?:,|$)/, take the second element of the list, and all the hard work is done. The complete code looks like this

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'say';

my @source = (
  "something,something2,third",
  "something,something3   ,third",
  "something,something4",
  "something,something 5  ",
);

my @result = map { (split /\s*(?:,|$)/)[1] } @source;

say "|$_|" for @result;

OUTPUT

|something2|
|something3|
|something4|
|something 5|
share|improve this answer
    
@stackoverflow that is intentional. The OP specifically asked for the strings to be presented without the trailing spaces. –  Borodin Mar 26 '12 at 20:47

I like your option 3 best. It clearly identifies the different steps you are taking to 'select' the right data and what extra manipulations you then do on it.

So if the criteria is 'readability': option 3 is the clear winner.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.