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I am writing some code as part of a framework for opening a file. The file is of custom type and should not be opened by more than one instance of my application. To stop multiple file opening I use a filestream to create a lock file and then keep said filestream open.

This seems to work in preventing another instance of my application from opening the file ( as it will fail in recreating the lock stream in the files open code ) but if the file is on a network share and the network drops then the original application also can not access the file any more.

The code to get the lock stream is as follows:

Try
        ' We need to keep this stream alive to prevent other applications gaining access to the lock
        mLockStream = New FileStream(mLockPath, FileMode.CreateNew, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.None)
    Catch ex As UnauthorizedAccessException
    Catch ex As DirectoryNotFoundException
        Throw
    Catch ex As IOException
        Throw New ProjectInUseException(My.Resources.LocalizedResources.ProjectInUseExceptionMessage, Nothing)
    End Try

In this I create the lock stream the first time round and then if another application tries to create it, it throws an exception and stops them from getting any further. This is kind of how it needs to work, unfortunately as I said, if this is done across a network and then the network connection is dropped for some reason then I can not delete the lock stream as I get an IOException telling me a process cannot access the file as it is open in another process ( which shouldn't be happening I don't think).

I hope this makes some sense, I have looked around but found nothing about this particular kind of scenario so I thought I'd see if anyone on here has had any similar experience.

cheers.

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You should post your answer as an answer, not as an edit to your question. I've done it for you and marked my answer as community wiki (so I don't gain reputation for it). That said, if you post your answer you can accept it, and then I'll delete mine (and you can be upvoted on your answer and get rep for it if it's good/correct/right). –  casperOne Mar 26 '12 at 17:51
    
Do you mind copying the answer and then selecting that answer? My answer (in your name) shouldn't be up here in the first place. Once you post that answer, I can delete mine (which is in your name). Your answer should be in your name. –  casperOne Apr 10 '13 at 12:32

2 Answers 2

Answer by Dracanus:


So I spent a lot of time assuming that the issue was some deep, dark scary .Net thing when in fact the fix was a little easier than I thought. I changed the initial stream creation to use FileShare.Read. Upon closer inspection of the FileShare enumeration I found that FileShare.None declined open access for the process that created it too (

Declines sharing of the current file. Any request to open the file (by this process or another process) will fail until the file is closed.

So by changing this to FileShare.Read I could reacquire the lock when the network connection was re established and then dispose of it properly before deleting the actual file.

I hope this isn't too much gibberish and is useful for someone else. As with most of my programming issues, this was a case of the issue being simpler than I had expected, and throwing me off it's trail :)

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

So I spent a lot of time assuming that the issue was some deep, dark scary .Net thing when in fact the fix was a little easier than I thought. I changed the initial stream creation to use FileShare.Read. Upon closer inspection of the FileShare enumeration I found that FileShare.None declined open access for the process that created it too (

Declines sharing of the current file. Any request to open the file (by this process or another process) will fail until the file is closed.

So by changing this to FileShare.Read I could reacquire the lock when the network connection was re established and then dispose of it properly before deleting the actual file.

I hope this isn't too much gibberish and is useful for someone else. As with most of my programming issues, this was a case of the issue being simpler than I had expected, and throwing me off it's trail :)

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