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I'm trying to disable/enable controls based on user permission using a custom security framework . I'm trying to use this code in the codebehind file

protected void OnLoadComplete(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if ((ViewData[Constants.Permission]).Equals(Security.UserAccess.ReadOnlyAccess))
            {
                foreach (var control in this.Page.Controls  )
                {
                    control.IsReadOnly = true;
                }
            }
        }

But the IsReadOnly property of control is not available. Is there a way I can fix this or a better way to achieve this?

---Update---

Controller.cs

    [Proxy.AimsAccessLevel]
    public ActionResult Edit(int clientId)
    {
        ClientId = clientId;
        //SetClientDetails();

        var Selection = new SelectionArgs(clientId, null);

        if (Selection.SelectionFlag == null || Selection.SelectionFlag == "N")
            Selection.EffectiveDate = new DateTime(DateTime.Now.Year + 1, 1, 1);

        return View(Selection); 
    }

proxy.cs

public class AccessLevel : AuthorizeAttribute
        {
            protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
            {
                Roles = Constants.AccessLevel.FullEdit + Constants.AccessLevel.ReadOnly.ToString() +
                        Constants.AccessLevel.RestrictedEdit;
                return base.AuthorizeCore(httpContext);
            }
        }
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2  
MVC does not have a codebehind. Are you using MVC or WebForms? –  Wouter de Kort Mar 26 '12 at 15:01
    
im using mvc i used <%@ Page CodeBehind="Edit.aspx.cs" Title="" Language="C#" MasterPageFile="~/Views/Shared/Site.Master" Inherits="Views.Selection.Edit" %> has given me no errors –  Antarr Byrd Mar 26 '12 at 15:08
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1 Answer

You shouldn't be using codebehind with ASP.Net MVC - it goes against the principles of MVC. A view should not be the thing deciding if a user has permissions or not. Deciding if a page is viewable belongs at the controller level.

A better way to handle permissions is by using the [Authorize] attribute on your controllers. Ie,

public MyController : Controller
{
    [Authorize(Roles = "admin")]  // Uses default FormsAuthentication
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        // ...
    }
}

You can write your own Authorize attribute to tie into your custom framework:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Method)]
public class MyAuthorizeAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    public override void OnAuthorization( AuthorizationContext filterContext )
    {
        // ... authorization stuff here ...
    }
}

Then use it on your controller action:

public HomeController : Controller
{
    [MyAuthorize]
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        // ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would add this override to the controller? –  Antarr Byrd Mar 26 '12 at 15:16
    
(fixed a bit of formatting). No, the override does not go in your controller - that's part of the custom attribute. The attribute then goes on the controller, or the controller action you wish to restrict. –  Leniency Mar 26 '12 at 15:22
    
I can't access the the source for the framework. It is being accessed via a webservice –  Antarr Byrd Mar 26 '12 at 15:29
    
Call the webservice from the attribute then. –  Leniency Mar 26 '12 at 15:36
    
I'm trying to use you approach but still am a bit lost, I have posted my changes above. –  Antarr Byrd Mar 26 '12 at 18:12
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