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I have a regexp which matches phone numbers

(((\d).{0,5}){7}) 

but now I want a regular expresion which matches a phone number written with alpha characters, like this :

nueve nueve tres uno cinco cero tres cinco cinco siete
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just a bit of advice - people are more likely to help you out if you are likely to help them out in return - you have many questions asked which do not have a selected answer, and people might be deterred from spending time answering with very little chance of reward –  Code Jockey Mar 26 '12 at 20:57

1 Answer 1

My guess is that you need this for some kind of form where you don't want the users exchanging phone contact details. Maybe they have to pay a subscription fee to be able to contact the other users of the service (by phone). Some users will sometimes try to put this info into a message by putting it in strange formats (numbers as words). Is this assumption correct?

If so, then i'm not sure regex is your best solution for this. You would have to do something like this:

\b(zero|one|two|three|four|five|six|seven|eight|nine)\b

You could then say that if it matches, then the message is invalid. Big problem with that though is that the user could simply enter the numbers in a different language, or with miss-spelt but easily understandable words - or they could add spaces (or any kind of punctuation) between each letter (there are many ways around this).

You might be better off by doing some kind of fuzzy matching that returns a rank value (Levenshtein distance) that says how likely it is that the user has entered a phone number in the message. You then have a threashold for that rank which if exceeded causes it to fail validation. This is much more complicated than basic regex though. Here are a few links you can check for more info:

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