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Keep going around circles, but I am still unclear about this. Have a feeling about the answer; but not sure. Which code below consumes more memory? [Should be the former, if I am correct.]

double x;
double* y = new double(x);

OR

double x;
double* y = &x;
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up vote 7 down vote accepted

In the former, two doubles exist (x, and the one pointed to by y). x is allocated on the stack, and y on the heap.

In the latter, only one double exists (x, also pointed to by y). There are no heap allocations involved here.

So, on the face of it, you are correct.

In both cases, there exists one double on the stack, and one double* also on the stack. The difference between the two is that in the first case, there is also a double allocated on the heap (the one allocated by new double(x)). Therefore the first case requires more storage.

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Are you sure? If we had to consider the RAM memory consumed overall by such a code (think millions of such doubles)...I need to know for sure if the former is correct. I understand that a pointer itself consumes a fixed 8 bytes (say, on a 64-bit system); so when you look at it like that, the first code appears to uses 2 x 8 (or is it 3 x 8 because of the new on the right hand side of the assignment in the second line?) bytes, while the second also uses 2 x 8 bytes. Which is correct? – squashed.bugaboo Mar 26 '12 at 15:21
    
Yes, I've edited to clarify. – Graham Borland Mar 26 '12 at 15:24
    
You ended your comment saying "second case requires more storage". Is that a typo? Did you mean, "first case.." instead? – squashed.bugaboo Mar 26 '12 at 15:26
    
@squashed.bugaboo yes, thanks. – Graham Borland Mar 26 '12 at 15:27
    
Thanks, that fixed ideas in my head. Cheers. – squashed.bugaboo Mar 26 '12 at 15:33

The following consumes sizeof( double ) + sizeof( double* ) plus sizeof( double ) on the heap:

double x;
double* y = new double(x);

The following consumes sizeof( double ) + sizeof( double* ):

double x;
double* y = &x;
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wow thats uncanny. haha – Preet Kukreti Mar 26 '12 at 15:20

The first one. There are two doubles and one pointer (usually long int)

In the second one you have only one double and one pointer

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In this example:

double x;
double* y = new double(x);

you have the memory space for x, for the pointer y, and the new allocated memory that stores a copy of x, and is pointed by y.

In this example:

double x;
double* y = &x;

you have the memory space for x, for the pointer y which points to x. This uses less space.

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double x;
double* y = &x;

will take sizeof(double) + sizeof(void*)

double x;
double* y = new double(x);

will take sizeof(double) + sizeof(double) + sizeof(void*). Also allocates memory from the heap via new. There will also be more bookkeeping overhead based on the heap allocator (especially if it breaks up a contiguous free chunk), and it will be slower.

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first allocate space for 1 double at first line, then at second line allocates space for 1 pointer and another double, and copies value from the old one. The latter allocate space for 1 double and for a pointer. So first is more memory consuming.

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