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Im trying to learn a bit about c++ and have run in to some trouble.

I have the following code:

char board[5][5];
ifstream myReadFile;
myReadFile.open("c:/test.txt");

for(int i=0; i<5; i++)    
{
    for(int j=0; j<5; j++) 
    {
        while (myReadFile.good())     
        {
            board[i][j] = myReadFile.get();                 
            cout << board[i][j];
        }
    }
}
myReadFile.close();

for(int x=0; x<5; x++)
{
    for(int y=0; y<5; y++)
    {

        cout << board[x][y];
    }
    cout << endl;
}

Now i was expecting the first loop to read the chars from the txt file and this works, so yeah! But the second loop, i was expecting to print the same char back to cout. However this was not the case, so i add the line

cout << board[i][j]

to the first loop to see if they where loading correctly. This is the result i get

results

Can someone explain why the second loop isn't printing the same as the first.

share|improve this question
    
could you post text.txt file contents? –  logoff Mar 26 '12 at 15:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

you are replacing board[i][j] immediately after reading a char from file. Put the while loop as the outer most loop.

 while (myReadFile.good())     
        {
            board[i][j] = myReadFile.get();                 
            cout << board[i][j];
        }

Here, it continuously replaces board[i][j] with new character while i & j remains the same.

share|improve this answer
    
An additional problem is that myReadFile.good() tests if the previous read worked, not if the next get() will work. –  Bo Persson Mar 26 '12 at 15:48
    
good() returns true if none of (errorbit, failbit & eofbit) is set. So it can be used to like "read until eof". Your statement "if previous read worked" takes only failbit into consideration. But good() is better than that. –  Blue Moon Mar 26 '12 at 15:56
    
No, it doesn't tell if the next get() will reach eof. When reading one char at a time, you don't know if there is a next char. –  Bo Persson Mar 26 '12 at 15:59
    
yes you are right, itdoesn't tell that. A simple check can be added if next read is success after rewriting the original code inside the begniing of the while loop. –  Blue Moon Mar 26 '12 at 16:08

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